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Discussion Starter #1
I've gotten into fly tying and I really enjoy it. I'm getting into too many patterns, though, and I think I'll limit them to the ones that are most efficient to stock up on. What patterns would you guys tie if you had to limit yourselves to three or four? I frequently fish the South Platte in all the major sections, and I nymph most of the time. I do a lot of RS2's and Pheasant Tails, WD40's, thread midges, and tons of San Juan worms cause they're easy (hate to use them for philosophical reasons because its a worm rather than an insect, but they work real well for me. I don't do too many dry flies.

On the topic of using a limited number of flys, my brother has bumped into Rim Chung of RS2 fame on a couple of occasions and he is naturally fanatical about his creation. I understand it is the only fly he uses-ever! Now that's confidence (or experience) with a single pattern. I know it works, but personally, I have never caught anything on an RS2
 

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Keep tying the ones that you are:
Copper Johns (red, green)
scuds

Dries I would do
Elk hair caddis
BWO
 

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Looks like you are tying the major flys for that river....if you are getting bored with those patterns you might try some varients on them...such as a beadhead flashback pheasant tails. One other pattern I didn't see listed that has done well for me is a baetis nymph. Also, some terrestrial patterns in the summer/fall can do very well. My fav is a cin/black ant (cin. butt and black head with some brown hackle tied in the middle.....but hopper and beatle patterns can also produce nicely. In regards to RS-II's, they are very productive, but I've caught most of my fish on them within an hour or two from a hatch, or often during a hatch when I'm fishing a dry/dropper combo. Often times you'll get them on the swing at the end of your drift when they are imitating a hatching bug. Gray has been my most productive color, but brown and olive have also produced. The RSII is probably one of the top 3 flies fished on that river, so again, you might try a varient such as a sparkle wing, or try one with some antron tied in for the tail.
 

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I'd definetly agree with all the above posts. The RS2, the midge and the PT are definetly some building block type flies. With the RS2, you can do so much. By varying your color you can create flies that can pass as a lot of differant insest.
 

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I forgot to mention the scud. This crustacean is far more prevalent in many aquatic ecosystems then people tend to believe. At the very least its an excellent point fly when tied in orange or even pink late in the season. Its slightly more difficult to tie then some of the one's you've been building, but its by no means out of the beginning tier's ability.
 

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When I was 16 and fished waterton alot I would always see Rim and he would always ask where my Fly Rod was. finally one day I show up with it and for the next month he showed me the ins and outs of nymphing. He was really a nice guy and extremely generous with time and RS-2
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've got to try those scuds. I hear they work well, and I like the way they look. Haven't tried to tie one though.
 
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i never go wrong with a san jun droppin a pheaasant tail

then just rotate the pheasant tail out with a black beauty, scud, or tiny cream colored midge
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Y'know, I really cringe at using San Juan worms because they look like, well, a worm instead of a fly. Nevertheless, they work really well for me and I go back to them all the time. Besides, even I can tie them ;D
 

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i spin fish nymphs and the only fly's i use are

pheasent tail
prince nymph
wooly bugger
glow bug

they seem to be the standard must haves in colorado (but what the hell do i know i have never casted a fly rod) in addition to the flashback, san juan worm, and buckskin caddis. what else do you guys see as must have sinking flies?
 

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sorry bout that, This is a tough ? You could ask ten folks and get ten different combinations. One pattern that I think all should carry is the Gold Ribbed Hares Ear. A great searching fly. You can tie it in different colors to imitate a mutitude of bugs. I would agree that pheasant tails are a must. Woolly buggers rank right up there for me in still water along with scuds. If you ever fish for warm water species, a clouser minnow is a must in my book, also a crwdad pattern. I guess it would depend on what kind of water you are going to fish and what fish you are targeting. I like to carry many different patterns. I never know where and what I will be fishing for. To answer you main ? for that type of river, I would tie up a bunch of RS2 or WD40's, bead head flashback pheasant tails, Bead head GRHE, and some kind of streamer. Lots of different sizes and colors. Enjoy your time at the bench and good luck with your decision.
 

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Honestly I'm just not a big fan of the generics. Princies are ok, PT's same story to me as is the wooly bugger. If I don't know what the heck is coming off then yea I'll throw a prince, a PT or a wooly bugger. More often then not though, if I have a good grasp of the hatch I will always catch more fish imitating the emergers rather then the searcher type patterns that kinda just look like a lot of things.
 
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