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Discussion Starter #1
So I am gearing up for my first spring chasing Walleye. I plan on sticking with Cherry Creek and Aurora. I have an entire collection of bass gear but not much for Walleyes....

If you had to pick 5 lures for Walleye what would you choose- it would be interesting to see what you use and it might help me figure out what I need to buy...
 

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bferg_80002 said:
So I am gearing up for my first spring chasing Walleye. I plan on sticking with Cherry Creek and Aurora. I have an entire collection of bass gear but not much for Walleyes....

If you had to pick 5 lures for Walleye what would you choose- it would be interesting to see what you use and it might help me figure out what I need to buy...

A long snell.

A crawler harness.

1/4 oz jig head

Deep diving crank bait

Either another crawler harness or jig head...

Some barrell swivels and some big weights (I like the 1.5-3 ounce bottom bounders with the sliding clip but some heavier weights with a little bit of line and a swivel to slide on works good too)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have read a lot about cralwer harness but have never used one. I assume you just tie them on the line? Do you use a bottom bouncer with that? Any reading you can reccomend for a 1st time crawler harness user would be much appreciated.
 
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During Spring you will have to realize that walleyes might be hungry, but they are cold blooded creatures and they don’t want to move to far to catch there next meal. ;) They will react like they would if they were in cold front conditions.  

Whether you fish during the day or night, the fish are rarely deeper  than 30 feet. Many are shallower than 15 feet, and at night, 2 to 8 feet  is common. There are some advantages when the fish are this shallow.  

A >>variety of different methods<< will take early spring walleyes, since the fish’s general attitude can range from aggressive to neutral.  Location is easy, but the fish are often extremely spooky.

Jigs and live bait rigs are generally your best choices for this period.  The simpler the better.  Small jigs, tipped with a small minnow, are perfect.  Fish bright or fluorescent colors in dirty water, and natural or subtle colors in clear water. Use 1/8  to 3/8 ounce jigs, depending on the depth or current conditions you are faced with. The real importance lies in the speed at which you present the jig.  As long as it is slow and close to the bottom, you’re all set.  The water temperature is cold, and the walleyes are lethargic.

Bferg do you have boat? Think I recall you said something about canoe. Anyway, attack these early spring "eyes" from shore! ;D
 
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For year around, open water walleye's.

1. lindy rig components
2. Husky jerk
3. round jig heads
4. shad rap
5. slip bobbers
Not neccesarily in that order and just my opinion.

Slip rigging live bait, wide wobble stick bait, the ever versatile jig head (what can't you do with it?), tight wobble crank and slip float for deadsticking or live bait presentations to spooky fish.

That should simply cover all the major methods allowing you to fish a variety of ways without alot of money. I like slip rigging live bait. I'm not a big bottom bouncer/crawler harness fan, although millions of eye's are caught that way and if done right (with precision) is a deadly technique.
 

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I have alot of lures I love using for walleye, but the all time greatest Eye lure- a 1/4 ounce ball head jig, whether tipped with a leach, minnow, or worm. When the fish are slow, barely drag it on the bottom with the above bait and a twister tail. When the fish are active put on a plastic with a boot tail and retrieve it like a rapala. You can catch eyes anywhere anytime with this.

If you want to mix it up, especially when the fish are up and feeding - suspending jerkbaits are a blast. Typically Walleye are light hitters, something about a fast moving, erratic, jerkbait makes them just crush it, I have had night time walleye "beach" themselves trying to get a Husky Jerk.

I would fill the other three choices out with tube jigs, shad raps, and crawler harnesses.
 

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when you guys say jigs, do you mean tubes?like rootbeer color? I bought some  2 1/2"yum craw bugs,and some Gary Yamamoto 3" pumpkin black flake.Is that a good start? I love to jig rather then troll. what do guy think?
 

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I am a huge fan of tube jigs, most of the Walleye fishing I do though is use just a standard ball head jig with a mister twister tail on it tipped with bait. I have caught a lot of wallye with tube jigs but primarily only when they are feeding on crawdads. Brown, silver flake, and pumpkinseed are my favorite colors.
 

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bferg_80002 said:
I have read a lot about cralwer harness but have never used one. I assume you just tie them on the line? Do you use a bottom bouncer with that? Any reading you can reccomend for a 1st time crawler harness user would be much appreciated.

Normally get the harness on the bottom and keep it there and move it with varying speed. Bottom bouncers or a heavy weight with light line sliding above a swivel, best way to keep the lure down and keep it there (try to have the line at a 45 degree angle to optimize strike detection). A lot of people go by the rule of thumb of one ounce of weight per 10 feet of depth.

Everybody kind of has their own default. I like to bottom bounce and troll, I'm not a big crankbait guy and am weak at vertical presentations. In most cases if you have a mastery of any one of the big three presentations you can adapt it to just about any conditions...

In terms of live bait, my preferences are leeches then worms. Never had success on minnows without having to drill holes through ice first...
 
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1) Crawler harness with a bottom bouncer
2) Night Crawler on a circle hook
3) Minnow harness with a bottom bouncer (I tie my own)
4) Deep diving crank baits
5) Minnow rigged with a swivel and an egg sinker
 

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Bottom bouncers can work effectively to try and find active fish as well as trolling cranks, I like shad raps and especially the double jointd ones. But, if you really want to have good days you need to find the fish and stay on them. Trolling can produce some big active fish, but I would rather find them and sit on them and catch numbers. There are very few dragging tackle along hoping for something that are actually good at their craft. Nothing wrong with that, their fishing and having a beer...lol. I think if you can locate the fish, a jig and a leech slowly retrieved or dragged is deadly. Just my thoughts.
 

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grod_001 said:
1. Jigging spoons
2. jigging spoons
3. jigging spoons
4. jigging spoons
5. jigging spoons
I was just thinking,,,, do you like jigging spoons? ;D

Seems to me all the standard walleye baits have a time and place, be it live bait rigs, crank baits, jigging spoons, or jigs. You need them all and not just one of each, you have to have a selection of types, colors and sizes...
 
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based on years of walleye fishing in eastern canada, lake erie and other notable walleye fisheries - here is what i use.  as for out here in the west, i can't say i've walleye fished much so i don't know if things are different, but i am sure if they are they can't be that different.

#1.  northland soft floating jig head - run on a 4ft leader with a walking sinker above the main line swivel - tipped with a crawler (blown w/ air), leech or minnow.  use this rig while drifting, back trolling or slooow trolling.

#2.  heddon sonar jigging spoon.  use this while verticle jigging over structure.  not tipped with any bait.  this is a great early spring and fall deeper water technique.

#3.  hot-n-tot crankbait in silver/black or gold/black.  use this while flat line trolling the shore line of any lake at sun up or sun down.  close to shore that is - especially in spring.

#4.  1/8 oz or 1/4 oz round lead head jig with a curl tail power grub (twister tail style) - tipped with a leech or minnow.  use this while drifting, casting etc.  this works all the time, but really well for casting to shore, working rip rap or drifting flats and sand/gravel bars.

#5.  spin-n-glow harness - match the color of the spinner to the water clarity - tipped with a crawler, leech or minnow.  use this the same as #1.

#6 Bonus.  slip bobber rig - good ole hook, sinker and bobber rig - running a minnow.  use this to cover the water column and to effectively handle varied underwater inconsistent depth.  i use this rig to eliminate snags, but yet be able to get the bait down to the bottom 1-2 foot of depth one is fishing.  this is also a great way to pickup a mixe bag of species.  often when using this i pickup walleye, crappie, catfish, bass, perch etc.

the bottom line is walleye fishing is almost always best done with bait and some of the most effective lures/rigs/setups do not cost that much. but don't go nuts until you find what style you like. then go nuts and have a rainbow of colors, weights, etc.

and remember, when you catch a walleye, turn the boat around and go back over your area again and again - they hang together.

goodluck
 
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