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Discussion Starter #1
Just curious if anybody knows what they do with the pike they get in the gill nets. Do they keep them, do they release them? I cant find any info on it
 

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At Crawford they dump them all on the bank after they take "Stomach samples" , I have seen the massive piles of carcasses and it is sickening !
 

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Discussion Starter #6
At places like 11 mile. I figured they would kill them at lakes they dont want them but wasnt sure if thats what they did.
 

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Gill nets are meant to capture fish for sampling. As such the nets are left out to soak overnight. Fish that swim into the gill nets usually die as they cannot move enough water over their gills while trapped in the nets. Cheaper means of sampling...comes at a cost though as most fish die.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It says they use electroshocking, gillnets and creel counting. It says that non of these kill the fish, or they arent supposed to. I would still like to know what they do with the pike they get at certain lakes such as 11 mile or Spinney
 

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setthehook said:
Gill nets are meant to capture fish for sampling. As such the nets are left out to soak overnight. Fish that swim into the gill nets usually die as they cannot move enough water over their gills while trapped in the nets. Cheaper means of sampling...comes at a cost though as most fish die.
I don't think this is true for all fish, the walleye spawn is conducted with gill nets.
 

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UNREPENTANT SINNER said:
I think it also depends on the time in the net, there is some mortality on walleyes as well.
Exactly. In addition, gill nets for sampling have varried hole sizes to catch different sized fish. The walleye nets (from memory) are made to be the same size. Sampling nets are left out longer, walleye nets go into the water in the evening and are picked up first thing in the morning.
 

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Pike behave differently than most species in a gill net. They tend to roll themselves up in the net and do not become "gilled." My expereince is that mortality for pike because of the actual netting is very low.
 

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ClackaRam said:
Pike behave differently than most species in a gill net. They tend to roll themselves up in the net and do not become "gilled." My expereince is that mortality for pike because of the actual netting is very low.
So the pike kill themselves when they encounter gill nets? and then throw themselves in huge piles on the banks to rot ??
 

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ClackaRam said:
Pike behave differently than most species in a gill net. They tend to roll themselves up in the net and do not become "gilled." My expereince is that mortality for pike because of the actual netting is very low.
That is the same reason you never lift them out of the water in a landing net, the good ol' gator twist!
 

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FLYFISHGEEK said:
ClackaRam said:
Pike behave differently than most species in a gill net. They tend to roll themselves up in the net and do not become "gilled." My expereince is that mortality for pike because of the actual netting is very low.
So the pike kill themselves when they encounter gill nets? and then throw themselves in huge piles on the banks to rot ??
No they typically die when the fall in the knife. I do not know about big piles, typically they are spread across the landscape as they go through the chipper. ;D



I
 

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There is such a huge range of factors that play a part in the mortality of fish during netting. Water temperature is a big factor. If the nets are placed early in the season when temps are low, as in the walleye spawn, then mortality rates are much lower. If the water temp is higher then mortality will go up. Other factors such as dissolved oxygen content, etc. also play a part in mortality.

Even when doing population sampling, nets are only supposed to be placed at dark and picked up early in the morning. This has a big effect on the amount of pike which are actually captured in the nets. Pike do not move and feed at night as much as a species like walleye, therefore capture rates are usually much lower. The pike that I have actually seen caught in nets and still alive were all released.
 
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