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The upper poudre is a great place to fish. The entire length of the second wild trout water is loaded with fish. But even above that from big bend on is good. My number one go to fly rig for the poudre is a size 16-18 copper john trailed bt a size 18-22 black midge. Zebra midges work the best. I prefer the metal beaded ones but the clear beads work well also. Any black midge will get action year round, a black beauty is also a good pattern. The copper john is also my preference as a prince or pheasent tail will work equally well. In the summer terrestrial fishing is where it's at. Hoppers of all kids work great, I have found that beatle patterns work wonders. I don't know the name but a black rubber beatle with a colored foam post so you can see it drives them crazy. I have found that when I nymph on the poudre I do not fish as deep as I would in other places. I find that the fish either are not directly on the bottom or are more willing to rise to a fly. Just a theroy of mine I may be full of it. Dry fly fishing is great also but I am just mastering my "match the hatch" on the poudre. In the past I have always just bought what the guides tell me to or just threw a dry the same color as what the fish were feeding on. I need to get better with entimology. Give it a try and try some of your own patterns as well. Can't wait to hear some reports. It will be good to have another poudre fisher's brain to pick
 
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rocnesmonsta said:
You should only need two flies. An RSII olive and an RSII ;)
How do you fish that RS2, I've been tying some lately but haven't fished with them.
 

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Although it is technically an emerger, Rim Chung suggests you present it like you would like your wife to present dinner to you (a little sexist analogy, I agree, but it's on the RS2 website). If you are watching a football game on TV, you don't want her to say "dinner's ready, come and get it", you want her to put it right in front of you on a tray. In other words,fish it where the fish are feeding. If the fish are in the mood for nymphs, fish it with a split shot, dead drifted under a dreaded "bobber". If there is a hatch doing on, you can fish it downstream with a little lift at the end, like an emerging pupa.
 

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kinda unrelated at this time of year...but in regards to the RS2, through the summer months I love them in black with a white wing and forked tail while the tricos are coming off. I have used specific sunken trico patterns before, but this has always been my biggest producer when tricos are present and just a little past the peak of the hatch. By the way, is the RS2 just a western thing...I went into a shop here in TN a week ago and the guy had never heard of an RS2. I guess I'll keep that to myself in this neck of the woods, cuz the RS2 kill them out here just like at home!!
 

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I suggest you fish the RSII nymph just like silicone boy suggests. Dead drift with a split shot. I think the main key to fishing the RSII is in the weight. Some times you need it and other instances you dont. To do this you must match the hatch. What I mean by this is that you must follw the life form.
Before the hatch when there are nymphs fish it bottom. If you dont get you fly mucused by the algae once in a while your not getting it down. During the blue wing olive hatches here in Colorado if you time it right, man do you have countless numbers of fish. I would say the hatch here last about 4 hours. Thats when I turn to the Olive Rim's Semblance # 2. The great thing about this fly is that it imitates two different life forms...... maybe three if anyone agrees. One, the nymph stage. Two, the emerger stage. To finish it off the drowned stage. So what this means is that you must have the right amount of weight on this fly. You have the right fly you just dont know it. Its all in the weight.
 
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