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Hi, Flingers of the Fly,

Have time to counsel a neophyte wanting to (eventually) get a good pair of fishing sunglasses? I have a question:

Would you folks be nice enough to post some thoughts regarding the lens color you personally prefer and why?

I feel most drawn, I think, to high mountain lakes, if that factors into your advice. But of course moving water would be great too. (I've caught some nice fish on the fly, but haven't been able to get back to it in long time. Determined to make this year the year. Stay by your phone, Jim! ;D )

Note: Just to let you know, I have read Tangler's recent thread about sunglasses which did touch on this issue (lens color) a bit, but I wanted to make it the real focus here. If anyone wants to mention certain brand names or other considerations, that's fine too, of course.)

Sincere thanks!
 

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I have two favorites, my all time favorite is vermillion... but its suggested for mostly early morning or overcast days. The new pair of glasses I got are copper which is a more all around lens color.
I am colorblind, I do not know if that matters or not but I can spot structure and fish the best with these two lens colors then any other I have used... both pairs are from different manufacturers. That they do for me is allow me to see the fish and its shadow better ontop of getting rid of the glare.
On the river I have tried different colors in different situations but always end up back at those two colors for being the best for me, now if you ask my wife she has different preference and can see them better with amber and brown lenses... so I think results vary to much by person to really follow "guide lines" and you should test out lenses until you find the ones that work best for you in most conditions.
 

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besides the water is so clear in those high mountain lakes, you basically just need a lens that removes the glare.
 

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I have had both gray polarized and amber, and I'm more inclined to recommend amber. Improves the color, I guess. There's a lot of 'blue' out there on the water (gee whiz?) and the amber improves the color separation - I have had a lot easier time spotting fish with them.

Given, I wear prescription glasses, have had both a clip (gray - and the rotten things break all the time), and now wear Cocoons (which are the amber - which was recommended specifically for fishing) and have been very happy with them. I have toyed with the idea of prescription suns - hubby lost some very expensive Persols last year - but I have to take glasses off to tie knots and select flies as my prescription glasses are too strong for close up viewing. I do what a lot of anglers in my situation do - look underneath the edge of my glasses for close up stuff.

One weird thing about polarized lenses is you sometimes will see different stuff as you move your head from side to side (angles from vertical) - polarization is weird and sometimes tilting your head will help you find that fish in that pocket behind a log.
 

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In most conditions, I prefer copper or copper rose... a little red tint seems to really help... On clowdy days I like amber.
 

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From what I have read the benefits of gray are: 1) it doesn't distort color, and 2)they are the darkest lenses. Again from what I have read, seems like this would be an excellent choice for flats fishing or here in CO, fishing lakes above treeline in bright sun.

From what I have read, the benefits of amber are that it improves contrast and is best in low light. Brown and copper are generally darker versions of amber, with similar elements of improving contrast.

I have owned and worn glasses with gray, brown, and copper lenses. My current pair is a 7 year old pair of Smith/Action Optics with copper photochromic lenses, which I absolutely love. I like glass lenses better because I am hard on my equipment and they don't scratch as easy. In my opinion the copper is far better than gray for trout fishing because I spot fish better by contrast than by color.
 

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I've come to believe that his is hugely personal and depends on your eyes and (forgive the pun) your eyes only.

I have two pairs of polarized Fitovers, one dark gray and one amber. The dark grays work best for me on sunny Colorado days. The ambers work best in lower light situations.

Your mileage may vary.
 

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Don't mean to beat a dead horse, but when I'm fishing, I'm wearing rose lenses.
 

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Different lenses for different situations IMO. You can't just choose one if you have expensive sunglasses. You need to have a pair that you can change out the lenses with if you are going to spend $.

I preferred Rose lenses with my natives while fishing in cloudy weather. Sorelips had some nice amber lenses on the ark the other day that made my grays look stupid with the sunny weather and moving water.

Different shakes...
 

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Amber if you can only afford one pair. Amber will block a lot of glare on sunny days and still afford acceptable visibility when it's overcast or at dusk.
If you can afford another pair keep your eyes out for a deal on anything with yellow lenses. I bought a pair of Smiths w/ yellow a year ago for $38 on clearance at MRFC.com. They are vastly superior on overcast days and afford decent visibility well into twilight.
;)
 

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I agree my preference is a copper colored lens. It just seems to work better for me.
 

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I prefer gray..........true colors and dark. I used to wear copper/amber but after a days worth of fishing would end up with a crazy bad headache.....switched to gray and problem solved.
 

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HaberVision has a new lens that changes with light, check em out. COLORADO company to boot, and if you decide to order some, let me know, I have a discount code ;)
 

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I don't trust the lenses that change shades.

They change shades according to UV exposure. I've heard that they will go light if you're in your car because car windows are treated to block UV rays. So you'll be driving in bright sunlight and needing a dark tint but the tint on the lens will have adjusted for low light...

Also, on overcast days UV rays still come through the clouds so the lens will go dark when you would want it to be light.

Apparently the auto adjusting to a light tint is only good for dawn/dusk (when direct UV rays aren't reaching the lens yet) or indoors (but who wears sunglasses inside?)

None of this is first hand, but I did a lot of research on photochromic lenses recently and that's what I heard.
 

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I need some good glasses this year I have some Natives but nothing special imo. How about Haber can anyone give a thumbs up or down.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Trout said:
I need some good glasses this year I have some Natives but nothing special imo. How about Haber can anyone give a thumbs up or down.
In a recent thread of Tangler's, Oyey, TarponJim, and FlyFishGeek all had good things to say about them (HaberVision) ... and they're a Colorado company, which is kind of nice.
 
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