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OK, I know there are at least a couple of you out there on Colorado Fisherman. I need your thoughts. I have an an AK74 that I put together from a milled receiver I got from the Firing Line in Oklahoma. This is not a gunsmithing question per se.

The situation is this: The rifle fires every other round and then I have to eject/chamber a new round manually. Kind of defeats the purpose of a semi-auto. I know what is. In a demonstration of the concept that the enemy of good is better, I got an adjustable trigger made in the USA-apparently those millions of others in the third world that work just fine weren't good enough for me. I need the trigger to be adjusted to allow it to fully cycle.

Well, I called this gunsmith who shall remain nameless. His card says Former Ranger, Special Ops, etc. Well, he tells me that he doesn't know much about AK's and can't help me. WTF! I'm thinking that here I am, a lifelong civilian with no need ever to touch a rifle of any sort, and I can take apart and put together an AK (it's not that hard, only has 5 moving parts), FAL, and AR15 family gun in no time. Now, if my butt was ever on the line professionally, you can bet that I would learn as much about any piece of hardware that could save my life, foreign or not. I would learn how to use an AK, RPG9, a turn of the last century Enfield (probably a lot of those floating around Afghnistan to this day), heck even a Hind helicopter even though I would likely crash and burn shortly after takeoff if I tried.

My question is: what was your level of foreign weapons training in the service? I'm sure it must have been fairly extensive. Since this gunsmith was not as articulate as, say, Rottal or ePic (excuse me if I am leaving anyone out) or any of the other spec ops types I ran into around Fayettenam, I was wondering if he is even real. There are a ton of claimed special forces types around the country. Heck, a couple of years ago, there was a guy who got written up in the paper for being a false Green Beret. A colleague of mine (female) met him at a boyscout camp on a Fourth of July and was very moved by a speech that he gave and told me all about it. She even got set up with him. I hated to break the news to him that he was a fake. I hear there are even a few websites devoted to "outing" fakes.

So, do you think I'm being too harsh on the guy for not knowing how to deal with the "preferred weapon of the enemy" (a quote from Clint Eastwood, I believe)? Maybe he just didn't want to deal with it. I'd like to give him the benefit of the doubt if he truly was one of our bad boys.
 

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My unit did not do much training on foreign weapons, and most soldiers can barily do common maintence on their weapons. Each unit has an amorer, that takes care of most of the maintence besides the basic cleaning and stuff.
However our unit or atleast the weapons squad I was in has trained on the ak47, which I think is a pretty good gun. It may not be as accurate as the m16 but it can take one hell of a beating and still fire. We never took the trigger mechanism apart though, just the basic break down. I have had more training on the SA80 and the MAG while crosstraining with british troops.
 

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It really depends on what he did, it wouldn't be unusual for him not to have alot of experience with an AK as far as gunsmithing goes, where you're putting your name behind your work. It's completely different ballgame when you just need to make it shoot. And he's probably not fixing too many AK's out here, hopefully sticking more to deer rifles.
All that said, I agree that there are alot of guys who walk around claiming to be SF and what they really did is sit on a radio or get coffee.
 
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