Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have noticed a distressingly high ratio of trout exploding onto my dry fly vs. fish actually landed. I think it's about 5:1. I'm sure this is not the normal experience, but what is the typical ratio and what tricks can be made to improve it? It seems that I can generate a lot of interest but can't close the deal--kinda like my experience when I was dating :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Closing the deal is the most important part. My buddy and I went fishing in the Austrian Alps this summer, in the morning a huge Rainbow nails his dry fly and his knot breaks. In the evening a cute austrian girl spends the hours talking to him and showing interest, but for some reason he ends up coming back to the hotel alone. I told him he has to learn to Gotta seal the deal.
Are you using a strip strike? Alternate between setting the hook right away and waiting a second before you raise the rod tip. If the trout are picky they might be spitting the hook out before you react. If they are hungry and nailing your dry flies you might be pulling it out of their mouths. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Since I haven't fished with dries much after getting into nymphing I can only say that I've heard timing your hook set is what counts as Demeter said.

There is a small reservior by my house where I can go and catch small (8-10") largemouths on nearly every cast while spinfishing topwater baits such as buzzbaits or floating rapalas. I will sometimes get 2 or 3 hits on each cast and miss the fish.

since there is so much action, you can really analyize how the fish hit and what percentage of the time they actually hook themselves vs. setting the hook to get them or how much of a pause to use (if any) before setting the hook.

Interestingly enough...I find that the fish simply miss the lure a good percentage of the time but if they do miss they'll simply try again 2 or 3 times until they feel a hook and get turned off or get hooked and reeled in.

There does end up being a huge variation in each strike and the timing of how to set the hook for each individual fish. It's a cool expirement to try different pauses or not setting the hook at all to see what happens. Since I know I'll get a strike on the next cast i dont care if I dont hook the fish.

I'm sure trout in moving water add more variables to the strike equation, but it's a fish eating something off the surface after all so it's probably not that different.

Just thought I'd share my experience, good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I'll try varing my hookset time. I'm just a little kid at this point and I get too excited. At least I'm generating some interest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Hey Farmer Ted!
Do you ever catch any Bass larger then 10 inches in that resevoir? It sounds like it may be overpopulated.
I have been an advocate for catch and release but I am now becoming a proponent of creating healthy ecosystems.
Years ago, everyone killed their catch. It was unheard of to release a fish. Today many people practice catch and release. In some places rivers are filled with undersized and skinny fish that look like they escaped from a concentration fish farm. In some places too many people release their catch and the fish do not have enough natural predators to limit their population. I am a proponent of selective culling. If you consistantly catch undersize fish I think it could benefit the ecosystem to remove some and limit the competition. If done correctly you fill see a healthier population and will be able to catch a couple big ones.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,399 Posts
Haha, when I first started with flies it was all top water and I got the timing down pretty fast, then I was turned onto the nymph and have been mostly using a top as a strike indicator ever since.  (I still only been fly fishing for less then a year so I dont have a ton of experience) This weekend up on the gunnison they were hitting my dry just as much as my dropper, I found myself not getting the hook ups as much on the dry as I use to.  But I also noticed, before my brain could go "set that hook" it would say "holy cow did you see that" then go to the set the hook thought.  If you work on switching these thoughts around you will do better.
No sooner then I got the timing back, the trout started doing stuff I never had them do to my dry fly, had some browns think they were JAWS and come straight up about 3 inches above the water head first and drop straight back down.  Once again the "Oh my god did you see that" thought pops threw the brain before the set the hook set thought.  I also had a huge brown roll on my fly which was awesome to see, but sucked when I missed the hookup.  
The only way to get it all worked out is to practice practice practice.  I have to get back up to these areas where the big ones lay to work on playing them, as I can usually get them on the line but into the net is another story... Soon I'lll be the fly fisherman you see down on the river with a huge boat big game fish net slung over my shoulder like a sword.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
demeter:

I have actually caught a couple larger bass in the reservior and there are large carp and catfish in it as well. I think the reason the fish are so small is that the population got mostly wiped out during the drought years and the DOW recently re-stocked it (this is the case with smallmouth in Horsetooth Reservior also) so the bass are small but have actually been getting larger as the season progresses. There are definitely a lot of them in there so the overpopulation could come into play in the future but I would guess the ecosystem has to stabilize and we'll see what happens. The DOW has a 15" minimum for largemouth at this reservior (Dixon) so as the fish reach that size I'm sure some of them will be taken home and the population will thin out a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
I am nymph guy and proud to say on Delanney one morning i had an 0 for 22 streak than landed the next 11 hits I'm happy with 1 out of every 3 but i fished the Green last week and u never quite get use to a fish swimming up and eating your orange indicator.


Fish
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Strip strike's a good idea. So is getting ready when the drift looks like it's really in the money spot and setting up on strikes as fast as possible. Of course, there is a school of thought that you need to pause a bit before setting the hook. I think any of these work sometimes and not others. It's reassuring to remember you can do everything right and still not hook up.

When I used to fish for westslope cutts (a wonderfully innocent trout) about every summer day I was sure that my hook setting abilities were as good as they were ever going to be. Thing is, some days I'd have lousy hooking ratios and other days the fish seemed to do all the work themselves -- they could even be so aggressive that they'd jump out of the water and take my hopper on re-entry. A lot of it has to do with whatever it is that makes trout more aggressive and focused one day and not the next.

Being alert, having your line hand ready and not too much slack on the water is the right approach. Experimentation and practice counts for a lot in this area too.

If there are a lot of small fish in the waters you fish, and they're often the fish most likely to go after a dry fly, they can really pull down your hook-up ratio.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I am nymph guy and proud to say on Delanney one morning i had an 0 for 22 streak than landed the next 11 hits I'm happy with 1 out of every 3 but i fished the Green last week and u never quite get use to a fish swimming up and eating your orange indicator.

It's good to hear that other people have a similar experience. I try every kind of timing, bending the hook out/laterally a bit, and still the same. I guess my reaction will get better with time. As for fish hitting my indicator, it happens a ton! I found an indicator fly at Cutthroat Anglers in Dillion, and I'll start to make my own. Think of a foam ant with a bright orange fluffy thing on top, and a hook. I caught one last week on one. I'm also going to start gluing hooks onto my indicators. I'm not going to let the fish get off so easily if they are stupid enough to go after my indicator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
I'm not going to let the fish get off so easily if they are stupid enough to go after my indicator.
I find it interesting how people who are learning to flyfish are pounded with this idea that trout are somehow supernatural creatures with extrordinary powers of judgement and perception. I have to disagree!! They're just fish! and if a trout will strike a chartruse spinner or spoon in a lake or river, and a bass will hit a spinnerbait (which looks like it's from mars) trout will sure hit a funky looking indicator if they're in the mood, an imperfectly presented fly, or even a beat up unraveling nymph with half the wings and tail missing (personal experience here).

fish don't reason, if it looks reasonably like something to eat and they are hungry...bam, fish on.

even though i'm just learning, I really like flyfishing (like silicone boy) but i will not be sucked into the old stingy flyfisherman thing and get all wound up about perect everything.

anyway...catch the fish on your indicator...awesome. i havent had any strike mine but if they do, i'll stick a hook in the damn thing and maybe draw a happy face on it as well.

sorry about the rant, i just had to vent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Well I think it depends on where you are fishing how perfect your presentation has to be. Rivers like the Green and the Madison basically see hundreds on presentations a day from drift boats and guys huffing it on the bank so the drag portion of your presentation is important to be successful. I fished the Texas hole on the San Juan years ago and if you know the hole on average i bet 50 guys fish that thing a day. So I am putting my waders on and i here a guy bragging he was getting them on a size 24 black midge. Now i come from the throw big stuff to catch big fish school. So i started out throwing small midges and landed one and pumped the fish stuffed full of brown worms. I switched and landed 50 big rainbows that afternoon and watched all the rest of the guys land a couple here and there. So sometimes I think atleast I overthink where I am fishing. The San Juan worm was developed there because it works so anytime i head down there thats the first thing i throw on. It's not perfect by any means but it does catch alot of fish. So I guess what i am trying to say is don't try to outsmart the fish because they aren't that smart. Just outsmart all the Orvis dudes trying to look good and you'll catch a ton more fish.


Fish
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Never thought about drawing a face on an indicator. Great Idea! Maybe I'll put googly eyes on it and maybe some elk hair fibers like a mohawk. I'm going out to a private pond with a friend this weekend, and I've thought about having a contest to see who can catch a fish on the most ridiculous fly.
 
F

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
man ratio of hits to fish caught ..well in the early spring on my favorite stretch of water I was using a griffiths gnat right before it got dark ....I was getting mulitple hits on every cast and no fish.....I think its because I was fishing downstream(rookie) instead of up and when I went to set the hook I was pulling it out of the fish's mouth....so im probably 10 to 1 if not worse that 45 minute time frame messed up my stats big time
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top