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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone thought about talking to the DOW about stocking real Muskie's in the state. You know, I heard they don't spawn as successfully as pike, which in my mind, would make them a better option then pike in some waters where suckers or other junk fish are a problem. Muskie can grow to amazing sizes. I have heard of 60 inch fish. I always thought that it would be cool to go fishing for pike and have a chance at a fish that size. I know they have tiger's and though I have never caught one i know they grow big too but i don't think they grow as big as pure breed muskie's do. I am going to write the DOW and see what they say. You guys have any thoughts on this?
 

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They wouldn't be caught dead puting a cool fish like a muskie on the west slope. Heck, they don't even stock tigers, wiper, walleye, or anything else cool either. I don't really care myself cuz if they do stock muskies it will be in a lake a long ways from me anyway.
I doubt they will stock pure strain muskies, they may though.

Note this post edited and another removed so as to not muck up the forum.
 

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TroutFishingBear said:
It gives them job security.
Job security is good. ;D
 
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TroutFishingBear said:
DOW likes fisheries that they have to maintain to be good; its why they like kokanee, stocker rainbows, wiper, and tiger musky. It gives them job security.
Come on, TFB--

You know better.

Actually, CDOW likes different species for different reasons.  
Sterile hybrids like tiger muskies don't reproduce and therefore don't overpopulate a given piece of water.  Their numbers can be controlled by the number stocked.  They get big and can be effective at controlling rough fish populations.

Wipers get big and are aggressive and a great game fish and are sterile and won't overpopulate as can happen with both white bass and stripers in certain waters.

And the stocking of kokanee and stocker trout have nothing to do with job security either.  They're what a lot of casual fishermen and kokanee addicts (no offense intended, kokaneeking) want.

Job security has nothing to do with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Real muskie's don't reproduce very well. It seems to me they would be great for Colorado. Hell they might have been a better choice then pike back in the day.
 

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jesus here we go bashing the dow again.i deffinatley agree with don ,the idea that its mere job security is absurb. the dow does what they feel is nessary to matain a good fishery for all. not just the chosn few.also havent spent a whole lot of time on the western slope but i hear rifle gap has some pretty decent walleye fishing.
 

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Rifle is not much for walleyes at rifle anymore. There are some left but it just isn't that good. Not very many. Very good fisherman can still catch some though.
Juniata has good walleye fishing but it is shore only, walk in, no icefishing, fly/lure only, etc. Of course the eyes were illegally introduced in there.
 

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Contrary to popular belief, the DOW have an incredible amount of work to do. They have to maintain complex artificial fisheries in a very large and varied state. It's very different from maintaining natural fisheries that have been around for millions of years.

Until I get Phd's in wildlife biology and business management, and have 50 years in dealing with state government and funding as well as the public, I am not going to bash or second guess what the DOW is doing with the fisheries.

The Muskie question is interesting. even in MN where I grew up they are rare and often stocked/ maintained but the pike are everywhere and never stocked or maintained as far as I know.

It may be that in the geologic/ biologic scheme of things (talking millions of years here) that muskies are sort of on the way out and are having a hard time maintaining their lifestyles of maybe they've just never been that prolific. Since I haven't been around for any kind of geologic time, I can't say.
 
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not to topic bust, but i have been wondering, if one was to get a private lake on his/her own property
, could he/she put whatever he/she wanted in it?

muskie and other stuff we dont have here?
 

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Mustang said:
not to topic bust, but i have been wondering, if one was to get a private lake on his/her own property
, could he/she put whatever he/she wanted in it?

muskie and other stuff we dont have here?
Not quite...if you want to stock a private lake or pond, you have to find someone (one of the licensed fish brokers) to stock it for you. They (and CDOW biologists and researchers) are the only people with the clearance to import fish and they have to get clearance from the CDOW and sometimes the State Board of Agriculture on what species can come in. They generally don't allow you to bring in fish species that aren't already present in the state, and they also have restrictions on species by location (e..g, you can't stock grass carp in certain areas). When they want to bring in fish from outside the state the source has to certify that the fish are free of specific pathogens (whirling disease is a good example, so is largemouth bass virus) before the fish can come in.

The reason for this is that the state likes to have a good idea of what fish are present and where they came from. Earlier this year they caught a fish broker/trout farmer who had been stocking fish throughout the state without permission and they came downn on the farmer like a ton of stinky shad entrails.
 

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In TN and I presume CO, the DOW&F would have to do a watershed survey to see what is up and downstream from your lake or pond to do an assessment of possible biologic or special distortion should your stocking escape.
Sorry to continue the hijack.
 

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WW...my feeble understanding of the real muskellunge tells me that they would have difficulty surviving the Colorado winters. The tiger muskie is a hybrid of that species and the northern pike, which makes it more adaptable to the climate.

I was once told the only reason they use the muskellunge sperm and the northern female to incubate is to create a hybrid species that doesn't reproduce. This way the management agency can control the numbers of predators in the water system. If they escape, it is less of a concern.

Hope that helps. Here is a good chart I found for identification.

 

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my feeble understanding of the real muskellunge tells me that they would have difficulty surviving the Colorado winters.
Matt I am confused...northern Minnesota and southern Canada have real Muskies and it is far colder there than it is here...and for longer too...
 

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Mattsabasser that picture you posted arent those called pickerel's and not spotted or barred musky? Or is that just a location thing like paper mouths - crappie or brim - bluegills?
 

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Chain, redfin, and grass pickerel look like northern pike but are much smaller and are found along the eastern seaboard, east central and south central US.
 
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