Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
.

It would please me to know if this is helpful to you all.

I like to give back to the forum when I can, owing to all the help I've been given, and for my respect for the site's standards of operation. Sometimes I have trouble visualizing the relative size of CO waters in relation to each other, so I've spent the morning making a comparison chart. It helps me to see it in BLACK & WHITE. That's just the way my mind works. I usually try to compare everything to AURORA RES or CHATFIELD RES, but this is not always an easy standard. (Why they don't make all reservoirs perfect circles shows how silly the planners are!)



This is not all the waters in CO, but it is inclusive of many of trhe more familiar bodies of water. I checked the list for errors, and corrected one; but if you see more, point it out.



_______________________________________________________________





Relative Size of familiar Waters in Colorado



Under 1,000
Aurora Res = 640 Water Acres
Arvada Res = 180 Water Acres
Bear Creek Lake = 110 Water Acres
Cherry Creek Res = 880 Water Acres
Grand Lake = 500 Water Acres
Harvey Gap State Park = 160 Water Acres
Lon Hagler Res = 100 Water Acres
Lonetree Res = 502 Water Acres
Ramah Res = 75 Water Acres
Stagecoach Res = 780 Water Acres
Tarryall Res = 886 Water Acres
Trinidad Lake State Park = 900 Water Acres(fluctuates)
Turks Pond = 25 Water Acres
Union Res = 743 Water Acres
Vega State Park = 900 Water Acres
Yampa River State Park / Elkhead Res = 400 Water Acres



Over 1,000
Barr Lake = 1,918 Water Acres
Chatfield Res = 1,550 Water Acres
Queens = 1,900 Water Acres
Steamboat Lake = 1,053 Water Acres
Williams Fork Res = 1,810 Water Acres


Over 2,000
Green Mountain Res = 2,125 Water Acres.
Horse Creek Res = 2,603 Water Acres
Horsetooth Res = 2,000 Water Acres
Jackson Lake State Park = 2,600 Water Acres
Nee Gronda Res = 2,600 Water Acres
North Sterling Res = 2,880 Water Acres (fluctuates)
Sanchez Res = 2,000 Water Acres
Spinney Mountain Res = 2,520 Water Acres
Taylor Res = 2,009 Water Acres
Vallecito Res = 2,700 Water Acres




Over 3,000
Dillon Res = 3,200 Water Acres when full
Eleven Mile Res = 3,405 Water Acres
Nee Noshe Res = 3,696 Water Acres




Over 4,000
Pueblo Res = 4,646 Water Acres




Over 5,000
Adobe Creek Reservoir [a.k.a. "Blue Lake"] = 5,147 Water Acres
Antero Res = 5,000 Water Acres (can fluctuate)


Over 7,000
Lake Granby = 7,256 Water Acres when full


Over 9,000
Blue Mesa Res = 9,000 Water Acres

Over 15,000
Navajo State Park = 15,600 Water Acres

Over 20,000

John Martin Res = 22,325 Water Acres




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Water Acreage of familiar Reservoirs in CO.

.This was my source.

http://parks.state.co.us/Boating/BoatableWaters/Pages/BoatableWaters.aspx




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
(Alphabetical Arrangement)
Water Acreage of familiar Reservoirs in CO.


Aurora Res = 640 Water Acres:
Adobe Creek Reservoir = 5,147 Water Acres
(Blue Lake)

Antero Res = 5,000 Water Acres (can fluctuate)
Arvada Res = 180 Water Acres
Barr Lake = 1,918 Water Acres
Bear Creek Lake = 110 Water Acres
Blue Mesa Res = 9,000 Water Acres
Chatfield Res = 1,550 Water Acres
Cherry Creek Res = 880 Water Acres

Dillon Res = 3,200 Water Acres when full
Eleven Mile Res = 3,405 Water Acres
Grand Lake = 500 Water Acres
Green Mountain Res = 2,125 Water Acres.
Horse Creek Res = 2,603 Water Acres
Horsetooth Res = 2,000 Water Acres
Harvey Gap State Park = 160 Water Acres

Jackson Lake State Park = 2,600 Water Acres
John Martin Res = 22,325 Water Acres
Lake Granby = 7,256 Water Acres when full
Lon Hagler Res = 100 Water Acres
Lonetree Res = 502 Water Acres

Navajo State Park = 15,600 Water Acres
North Sterling Res = 4,065 feet

Pueblo Res = 4,646 Water Acres

QUEENS STATE WILDLIFE AREA:
Nee Gronda Res = 2,600 Water Acres
Nee Noshe Res = 3,696 Water Acres
Queens = 1,900 Water Acres

Ramah Res = 75 Water Acres

Sanchez Res = 2,000 Water Acres
Spinney Mountain Res = 2,520 Water Acres
Stagecoach Res = 780 Water Acres
Steamboat Lake = 1,053 Water Acres


Tarryall Res = 886 Water Acres
Taylor Res = 2,009 Water Acres
Trinidad Lake State Park = 900 Water Acres(fluctuates)
Turks Pond = 25 Water Acres

Union Res = 743 Water Acres

Vallecito Res = 2,700 Water Acres
Vega State Park = 900 Water Acres

Williams Fork Res = 1,810 Water Acres

Yampa River State Park / Elkhead Res = 400 Water Acres



.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
gofindyourowndamnfish said:
Very interesting. I had no idea that Granby was that close in size to Blue Mesa.
Yeah, that's the funny thing about our perceptions. Sometimes I just have a heckuva a time between my visual conception of a
place, and what its actual size is or isn't.

In fact, I would say that by an large, over half of these bodies of water really surprised me, when I saw their size in print compared to other
places.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
Adobe does not seem as large at Pueblo interesting...
Probably because I always see it when the water is low.

I wonder if Barr 1918 is the whole thing or the boatable portion?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
About ANTERO RES:

Different sites indicate different water acerage, and one
site indicates a Maximum capacity of around 20,000 acres. I guess the reason is that around
300 years ago, the site was a lake bed known as GREEN LAKE, which dried up. So it is a big, shallow bowl. Here's a couple of quotes.


Antero Reservoir in central Colorado and hotels, boating, fishing, ... The reservoir has a maximum surface area of 15610 acres and extends 35 miles up the ...(from findlakes.com)



Some federal website indicates Antero is

Owned and managed by the Denver Water Board. (Area 4,102 acres)

So I think it depends on just about anybody's Guestimate as to how much space it covers at any one time. Given the recent drought years, almost any figure could apply.
Besides which, what the heck do I know? LOL!




I seriously doubt that BARR LAKE is rivalling Chatfield. It might if FILLED UP, but it is shallow to begin with, and probably no where near full capacity, wouldn't you think?

. Remember also, that I am no rocket surgeon as to differences between SURFACE AREA and total WATER VOLUME. I just used the term WATER ACRES from the state website up near the top.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,272 Posts
Nawanda said:
I seriously doubt that BARR LAKE is rivalling Chatfield. It might if FILLED UP, but it is shallow to begin with, and probably no where near full capacity, wouldn't you think?
Nawanda, Barr lake is currently pretty close to being full. It has been fluctuating as usual but most of the winter was within a couple feet of being at full pool. Remember that roughly half of the lake at full pool is inside the bird refuge and off limits to boating/fishing. The area of Barr that you can fish is roughly about the same size as cherry creek at any given time. At low water, up to 90% of the water in the lake will be found on the side that is open to fishing/boating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,192 Posts
Nice info thanks for taking the time to do that.

With that said no way is Antero bigger than Pueblo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Bionic Man said:
Many of those numbers do not look correct. Jackson nearly as big as North Sterling and bigger than Horsetooth?----BionicMan
Seriously, I am surprised that the general public is not aware that Eastern Plains reservoirs as basically irrigation resources for local agriculture.


As a direct consequence, the volume of reservoirs like Jackson Lake is directly corespondent to agriculature demand and the supply by nature. It is not practical to expect such bodies of water to have an ongoing and continuous capacity.

.Hope that helps explain some variances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Good point about the eastern reservoirs used for irrigation. For the last 6-7 years many of them are a fraction of the size they can be when full. Some of them are even dry. We need above average snow pack in the mountains for a big run off and a wet spring and early summer during the growing season so there is less need for irrigation.
I keep hoping each year that this will be the year the reservoirs in Colorado can all be re-filled.

niteskies
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top