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I hope this works out - could be the answer we've all been hoping for:



The recent discovery of a new bacteria capable of killing zebra and quagga mussels has raised hopes for private and public organizations fighting to control the environmentally hazardous species.

Researchers Daniel Molloy and Denise Mayer, employed by the Albany, N.Y.-based New York State Museum, recently discovered a bacteria strain — Pseudomonas fluorescens — capable of killing zebra and quagga mussels without having lethal effects on other native species in the ecosystem.

“The Eureka moment did not come, interestingly enough, when we discovered the bacteria could kill zebra and quagga mussels, but came when we discovered the lack of sensitivity among non-target species,” Mayer said in a phone interview.

Mayer said scientists have found plenty of agents capable of killing the mussels, but in most instances they've also killed everything else in an ecosystem.

What makes P. fluorescens such an exciting discovery is it is uniquely devastating to the zebra and quagga mussels, infiltrating and destroying their digestive system, she said. Mayer and Molloy exposed fish, native mussels, waterfowl and other species to the bacteria and found they were unaffected.

“Our tests show the bacteria kills 100 percent of the target specimens when exposed,” Mayer said.


Here's a link to the entire article:
http://www.tahoebonanza.com/article/20110131/NEWS/110139999/1061&ParentProfile=1050
 

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OH BOY, and then in 5-10 years they will figure out that this bacteria destroys something else :mad: Scientists need to stop trying to play god and let nature run its course, the strong will survive and the weak will either adapt or perish. It has been that way for quite some time, man is the only creature that thinks it must change everything.
 

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It is great news, and could work well. :) Screw worm eradication worked, and I think the more recent Tamarisk beetle has been considered a success.

But at the end of the article, notice that they don't plan to discontinue their inspection program. They say they are still looking for non-native vegetation and other invasive species. ::)
 

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albow said:
But at the end of the article, notice that they don't plan to discontinue their inspection program. They say they are still looking for non-native vegetation and other invasive species. ::)
I noticed that, but keep in mind that's Cali - where big government spends regardless of whether they have the money or not. It would seem like there are a lot of things that have to happen before large scale use is attempted and then there will have to be some time passage before they can really assess effectiveness. Probably won't end the inspections here right away either, but IMO at least there's finally some hope.
 

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P. fluorescens ...oh my Gosh

I feel so relieved. I was so worried that all of the American waters would be just ruined.
This is hope.
 

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I sure hope this works out....only for the simple fact that maybe I'd be able to go to our lakes like we could back in the day. No inspections...no designated launch and load times....just a simple "thawed or frozen = open or closed".
 

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theo9805 said:
on topic - how do they introduce this to the infested lakes? i'd like to hear the logistics
It sounds like they're still working on that part.
 

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I'd find it a bit difficult to believe a bacteria could achieve 100% mortality in the wild. I guess we'll see, but I'm a bit skeptical at this point. That said, even if it slowed 'em down for a few years or significantly reduced the risk of inadvertent transport to uninfested waters, that would be of value.
 

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on topic - how do they introduce this to the infested lakes? i'd like to hear the logistics---Theo9805

They came from the Middle East and areas like the Dead Sea.
Riding on Merchant ships, they came to North America via the St. Lawrence Seaway and onward to infest the Great Lakes. Once there, the spread by fisherman's boats before anyone realized they were infecting us.

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Nawanda, I think he was asking how they would introduce the bacteria to mussel infected lakes in sufficient quantities to do damage.

I think we lather the hair ball called Colonative in the bacteria and make him swim the perimeter of Chatty a couple of times. Kind of a susquatch crop duster with zebra mussel killer bacteria embedded in a giant ball of steel wool. <snicker>
 

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Oh yeah, how to get the bacteria into the Mussels.

Well, um...the people at the Red Lobster Restaurants know a lot about Seafood. Let's ask them!
 

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"SCIENTISTS DISCOVER SOLUTION WITHOUT A PROBLEM!"

Yeah yeah, gotta nip it in the bud , I know. But still, that is funny right there. Just hope it does not wind up causing mass carnage in some random species.

SS
 

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swimbait said:
"SCIENTISTS DISCOVER SOLUTION WITHOUT A PROBLEM!"

Just hope it does not wind up causing mass carnage in some random species.

SS
Trout? Carp? We should be so lucky...
 

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Nutmg1 said:
Exactly funny how many just accept we have a mussel problem when they can't find any.
As long as the hysteria is closing lakes and limiting access we do have a mussel problem.
 
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