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Sorry, Hi-jack... Rock snot.

https://www.viu.ca/news/viu-professor-uncovers-mystery-rock-snot

We can SLOW spreading of invasive species but it will not be stopped, at least not in my lifetime. People are mobile. Some are ignorant, don't think, are lazy or don't care.
That is the most informative info I have ever read about didymo, thanx for posting SS, as goes a long way towards explaining some of the puzzling aspects connected to the spread of such a horrible invasive scourge.
Even tho it is still only an unproven finding, it could provide an answer to why it can move upstream (albeit slower than down river) also why a certain river can be affected yet another that joins it is not.

One aspect of the report I find at odds with tho is the description (quote)

Seemingly out of nowhere mucus-like, thick gelatinous mats of yellowish -brown algae were found clinging to rocks on the river bottoms. (unquote)

That would be a good description of the stuff down here in appearance, but to the touch has a deceptively coarse feel to it more like sandpaper or shark skin.
 

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Finally got out a couple times with the new aluminum bar soles on new Korkers boots and am surprisingly impressed thus far. I was on the local freestone where my conclusion before now was that plain felt is the best sole to minimize slipping. Studded felt, especially once the felt part is worn down some, is less stable for me on this freestone, but superior on Grey Reef tailwater with the greater amount of algae covering the rocks on the latter. The steel studs "ice skate" more readily on bare granite, resulting in more sudden inadvertent slips on the freestone stream, and make for way less fun just trying to walk on dry rocks on shore. The rubber soles are fine for walking/hiking on dry ground, but slip too much in the water, very unstable for me. But the aluminum bar soles seem to grip just about everything well, from dry granite, to slippery dry dirt on step banks, to algae covered immersed granite rocks, etc. They're noticeably heavier, but have added a lot to my stability. Anyway, I'm sold thus far, but we'll see how my opinion holds up in the next few months. For what it's worth.
 

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Thanks knute... I have been thinking about ordering some of the aluminum bar soles for my korkers.

I bought korkers even though I am pretty skeptical about new stuff that looks hard to field repair. And I have a fear that they are going to jam while on my feet and I may not have wire cutters handy.... We will see how they work out. They came with the rubber soles and felt. So far they have been OK. the rubber soles suck in the water but are ok for hiking, felt is great in the water but not on the trail.

But I was able to replace two old worn out pairs, one old cabelas felt with studs are still holding together but not real comfortable and the other rubber soled sims that I have had a few years and have fallen apart...
 

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Finally got out a couple times with the new aluminum bar soles on new Korkers boots and am surprisingly impressed thus far. I was on the local freestone where my conclusion before now was that plain felt is the best sole to minimize slipping. Studded felt, especially once the felt part is worn down some, is less stable for me on this freestone, but superior on Grey Reef tailwater with the greater amount of algae covering the rocks on the latter. The steel studs "ice skate" more readily on bare granite, resulting in more sudden inadvertent slips on the freestone stream, and make for way less fun just trying to walk on dry rocks on shore. The rubber soles are fine for walking/hiking on dry ground, but slip too much in the water, very unstable for me. But the aluminum bar soles seem to grip just about everything well, from dry granite, to slippery dry dirt on step banks, to algae covered immersed granite rocks, etc. They're noticeably heavier, but have added a lot to my stability. Anyway, I'm sold thus far, but we'll see how my opinion holds up in the next few months. For what it's worth.
As mentioned I have a pair of Korker wading boots that came with rubber soles plus a pair of spiked clip-ons ( felt prohibited down here ) Must say both options have fallen short of my expectations regards grip, therefore would be keen to try the aluminium option if they offer a firmer grip.

Question (albeit a dumb one perhaps ) :- do clip on soles need to match the boot size or does one size sole fit all sizes of boots ?

Question 2 :- If I decided to try some Alu soles ... how / where cold I buy them?
 

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Finally got out a couple times with the new aluminum bar soles on new Korkers boots and am surprisingly impressed thus far. I was on the local freestone where my conclusion before now was that plain felt is the best sole to minimize slipping. Studded felt, especially once the felt part is worn down some, is less stable for me on this freestone, but superior on Grey Reef tailwater with the greater amount of algae covering the rocks on the latter. The steel studs "ice skate" more readily on bare granite, resulting in more sudden inadvertent slips on the freestone stream, and make for way less fun just trying to walk on dry rocks on shore. The rubber soles are fine for walking/hiking on dry ground, but slip too much in the water, very unstable for me. But the aluminum bar soles seem to grip just about everything well, from dry granite, to slippery dry dirt on step banks, to algae covered immersed granite rocks, etc. They're noticeably heavier, but have added a lot to my stability. Anyway, I'm sold thus far, but we'll see how my opinion holds up in the next few months. For what it's worth.
I figured the aluminum would grip well as the Simms AlumiBite work very well. Unfortunately, I blow though the AlumiBites in a few short months making them a $100 a year maintenance fee. So do you have to buy the entire Korker sole or are they replaceable individually like the Patagonia bars? At Korker's $60 sole price I'd be buying new shoes every year just to replace the bars. I guess it all depends on the amount of time one spends on the water.
 

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I figured the aluminum would grip well as the Simms AlumiBite work very well. Unfortunately, I blow though the AlumiBites in a few short months making them a $100 a year maintenance fee. So do you have to buy the entire Korker sole or are they replaceable individually like the Patagonia bars? At Korker's $60 sole price I'd be buying new shoes every year just to replace the bars. I guess it all depends on the amount of time one spends on the water.
Could be a limiting factor for sure. I won't know for another year, I expect. My first pair of Korkers boots have lasted for about 3 years, but I probably only get in 30-40 days on the rivers a year. I just bought a new pair, along with the aluminum bar soles, but still use the old pair for lakes. I figure something on 'em will break in the next few trips, however. Anyway, I would expect to perhaps be buying new aluminum soles every year or so, but expect to get a couple years or more out of the boots at this point. Just speculation for the most part for now.
 

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Make your own Alum bars it is easy. get a counter sink drill bit and SS screws. three screws per bar and checking the screws and you will be good for 2 seasons
 

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I just wore out a pair of Korkers, and I only wore them out because I was feeling too cheap to replace them before that happened. The regular rubber soles that come with them are absolute crap, I've never slipped so much in my life!
 

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Sorry, missed a couple of the questions above. Korker soles have to be bought in the same size as the boot. Bars appear to be riveted on, plus the sole is fairly thin so doesn't look like you could use screws at all.

Rockymt - I have some older felt Chotas with stud holes on 'em that I might want to try the "DIY" alum. bars. Where do you get the bars? I would guess you need to countersink the screw holes in the aluminum to avoid having SS screwheads contacting the rocks instead of the aluminum?
 
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