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I thought I enjoyed small stream and beaver pond fishing, but I've been having a lot of problems lately. I know you have to be sneaky, and I try. The paradox is I have to get up close to the stream or beaver pond to tell whether there are any fish in there. Many of them are in high, inaccesible locations, so some of them may be barren. It changes from year to year also, so I think you should at least check to see whether it is worth fishing. I spent much of today in South Park looking for brookies (per a previous thread), but what few fish I did see would scatter like mice (or fish). Any suggestions? I'm beginning to think I should stick to the big waters.
 

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the first time a work a strech i always aproach from downstream and make a few blind casts over the dam to try and surprise the spooky ones then if no takers then i aproach the pool and try to keep some plants or trees between me and the pool sometimes i end up casting from my knees also

its kinda like combat fishing, casting from behind cover
 

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I just got back from a beaver pond brookie bash, and experienced some of your troubles. The fish were spooky, but hungry. The technique I found most successful is this: Slowly approach to within a rods length, then get down on your knees to cast. I like to use a two fly rig; an over sized dry fly on top trailed by a size 18 or 20 nymph. Cast out and let the fly sit for a minute, or as long as you can hold out. Then slowly work your fly’s back, keeping the top one floating. In the situation I was in on Sunday, the high wind made for a down steam approach with long casts more effective than working upstream. In small waters like this the fish pay attention to ground predators, and are attune to ground vibration and activity. Stay off of the dams and other soft ground that will alert your presence to the fish.
 

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Alot of the time the fish will be holding at the upper end of a beaver pond; where the stream comes in. The bigger fish will be in the prime feeding area and smaller ones downstream. There will be some small ones in the pond itself, but the best fish are up eating what the stream brings them. My best days have come, slowly working my way into position to fish that area where the stream comes in and forgetting about the beaver pond itself. Put a size 16 royal wolf on and have some fun. Fish the best area first and chatch the biggest fish first. You may be able to catch a couple more, but they will be smaller. Move up to the the next beaver pond and do it again. That's my story and I'm stichin to it.
 
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