Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My birthday present to self came in to day.. a bunch of jigs and associated (Bitsy bugs, craw trailers, dbl skirt grub & jig heads, etc.) stuff. The goal is bass. The problem is I don't really have a clue how to fish these. Need expert advice.

I tried the jig/craw for an hour or so over at Platte river park pond #1 (Completely open water, #2 is mostly ice). Caught a lot of the green icky weed that grows in there. Might have gotten one hit.

Anyone willing to give advice to the jig newbie?? :-[

JW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
The bitsy bugs work very well on rocky bottoms for smallmouth. If you trailer them with a gulb minnow or a contrasting colored grub you have a potent swimming jig that has more action as opposed to just the skirt that flutters while still or in a constant swim motion. "Swimming" as in when you swim it for longer distances off of the bottom before you pause again.

Rig to some heavy line as you will be pitchin those jigs into heavy cover where snags and trees and weeds will test your setup when you hit them.
You'll get it down very fast come March.

Always test what you've got in the shallows in front of you where you can see the action of each individual rigs.
The jigs that include a weed guard are a tad helpful at deterring weeds and stones but they are super stiff and I know I've lost fish due to those brissels.

Quick jigging motions to get it off the bottom while leaving a slack line after the rip will let it fall as slowly as possible.
The best time to fish this way is to fish during the calmest of wind and water conditions as you will see a strike as indicated by your line putting off tiny ripples for a split second as it floats on top of the water.

I get guff from fly fisherman who are opposed to this technique. If you rip the jig off of the bottom with your rod tip up and with a TINY bit of tension on the line you can lay it back down on the water so the surface tension keeps the line a bit taught where it meets the jig/hook. This way you can "spot" a bite and then you can set the hook.
These fly fisherman will say that they think it's lame or whatever when in fact they use floats and bobbers of their own.

It's just a great way to learn "where" in the water column and "when" in your retrieve they will hit the lure...whether it be on the fall or as it rests on the bottom or when it's obvious that they hit as it's coming off the bottom.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
I stepped up to jigs and trailers after I learned myself the technique of rigging Senko's in a Texas style. Weedless, castability, accuracy of cast, and basically the best of all worlds when it comes to a retrieve... you can drag it on the bottom, swim it through any depth, swim it on the surface, swim it over thick weeds on the surface, or hand it from structure while casting over thin branches or trees.

It seems like a noob technique to slack the line to float on the surface to see strikes but if you let the line sink in the water you will miss a TON of light bites, especially bass who are in spawn mode that tend to grab a plastic and drop it off away from their nest.

Darker colors tend to produce a lot more than lighter colors along the front range here in CO.
Working it parallel to the shore will produce more hits and working it away from shore in a boat or tube will produce even more hits due to the natural appearance of bait coming out of shallows and because it sets it apart from every single shore fisherman that retrieves toward themselves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
Look at all of the videos you can find on YouTube and you will learn a ton about how these fisherman present different lures to the fish and where at in the body of water.
I would say that a lake will be a better place to learn than a river system, as it's tough enough with the conditions and prey selections that the fish have to endure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I probably need to learn to flip and pitch with a baitcaster or get the baddest spinning setup I can find. I suspect my ML trout gear not gonna drag jigs through the junk.

JW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,402 Posts
There is so much to fishing Jigs..I could advise while fishing one on one, but on here it's a bit hard.
But they are one of the best lures for the Bass along the front range.

Here is a website that has a ton of info, the link is on the main "lure" page; if you scroll down you'll see several Jig articles by top bass pro's on jig fishing. I hope this might help you get started??

http://www.bassresource.com/fishing/bass-fishing-articles.html#lures

D.J.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
That site is one I browse through on a regular basis during lunch or other periods when I should be working.. 8)

Good info. Just looking for any specific ideas for front range.

JW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,159 Posts
JW said:
My birthday present to self came in to day.. a bunch of jigs and associated (Bitsy bugs, craw trailers, dbl skirt grub & jig heads, etc.) stuff. The goal is bass. The problem is I don't really have a clue how to fish these. Need expert advice.

I tried the jig/craw for an hour or so over at Platte river park pond #1 (Completely open water, #2 is mostly ice). Caught a lot of the green icky weed that grows in there. Might have gotten one hit.

Anyone willing to give advice to the jig newbie?? :-[

JW

Tip: Cast lure in water supected of holding fish that have been known to forage on crawfish.

Work lure back slowly by using rod tip only to move said lure. Utilize reel to only retrieve slack line caused by moving rod tip. Repeat process slowly in order to mimic the movements of a crayfish.

Repeat as necessary. Cadence and speed of said retrieve varies according to water temp and season of year.

If you have any more questions, pm biggiesmalls for additional info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,877 Posts
Jigs are about the most satisfying way to fish there is because you impart all the action that fools the fish. Alot of good advice here I'd just add to fish slow and even slower in cold water. Theres a learning curve to jig fishing but once you get it down you'll be rewarded with bigger fish than you can catch with many other lures.

Also, don't overlook the Uncle Josh pork baits-maybe I'm old school but these work great, especially in cold water.

Fish the jig with short hops, drag it, shake it, just don't be in a hurry to get it back in. Brown, black, dark green, some orange-they're all good colors. Also fish the lightest jig the wind and depth will let you get away with-lighter jig equals slower fall which is usually the way to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,897 Posts
JW said:
I probably need to learn to flip and pitch with a baitcaster or get the baddest spinning setup I can find. I suspect my ML trout gear not gonna drag jigs through the junk.

JW



If you are throwing large jigs w/ weed guards {jig&pig type jigs} I'd say you might want to go with a MH rod. You can find spinning rods that will be heavy enough to handle the jigs and pulling bass from cover if you need to. On the other hand if you're throwing lighter jigs w/ grubs ex. a ML rod might be good...if you're in open water no problem landing bass either. Anyway besides the gear I have one piece of advise; If you're not sure set the hook. A lot times fish will take the jig without hitting it hard. Every bump I just pull and if there's weight I keep pulling to set the hook. I try and keep very little to no slack in the line when fishing jigs so after pulling the jig I take up the excess line.


If you're really looking to get into a lot of bass fishing I'd think about getting a MH rod w/ a fast action or xfast, that can handle lures up to 1oz or so, that will cover the use of jig&pig's and most other bass lures. I mainly use a 6'6" MH baitcaster for almost all my bass fishing from spinnerbaits, to jigs, to texas rigs.


Hope this helps, tight lines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
978 Posts
You can let the fish tell you how to work the jig. Sometimes you can pop it a couple feet with the rod tip, sometimes you have to barely drag it to get bit. Stained water, black is the best....clear water you want to go with more natural colors, brown, green. They can mimic crayfish or baitfish like a bluegill. You can also swim a jig like a spinnerbait and that can work well. If your using bigger jigs with big heavy hooks, you want to set the hook pretty hard. I use 12-17lb line when jig fishing, depending on where and what kind of cover I'm fishing. It will be fun for you learning to fish jigs, just stick with it and you'll get it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,547 Posts
bassboy said:
You can let the fish tell you how to work the jig. Sometimes you can pop it a couple feet with the rod tip, sometimes you have to barely drag it to get bit. Stained water, black is the best....clear water you want to go with more natural colors, brown, green. They can mimic crayfish or baitfish like a bluegill. You can also swim a jig like a spinnerbait and that can work well. If your using bigger jigs with big heavy hooks, you want to set the hook pretty hard. I use 12-17lb line when jig fishing, depending on where and what kind of cover I'm fishing. It will be fun for you learning to fish jigs, just stick with it and you'll get it.
This nailed it down! :) Don't forget light wire footballs on light line in clear water! I have been known to fish footballs on 4lb., to great effect. Learn how to pitch if you don't know how.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I currently have a ML setup with 4lb which should work for the 1/8 oz bitsy with grub in clear water, and I am setting up a MH with probably 20# braid for the heavier jig combos. I am looking at the BPS house brands for my second rod/reel/line.

JW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,425 Posts
If you are planning on putting that braid on a casting reel, you should not go below 30#(castability) and I would suggest 50#. On a spinning reel you can get away with lighter braid but make sure your drag is sufficient and set correctly or you will break off on hooksets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
All spinning.. I have no clue what to do with a casting reel..

I understand you have to keep the drag relatively loose compared to the line strength to avoid yanking the bait out of the fish's mouth, breaking off, causing line to dig in, etc. I also understand I gotta learn a new knot.

JW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
You know, I definitely have to get into this. I have some jig stuff already, and both Spinning Reel and Rod to do with per the recommendations. I'll have a look at the YouTube videos on Texas Rigging the Senkos etc.

Thanks for the topic fellas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,425 Posts
JW said:
This is the combo I am looking at.. Looking for good all around performance medium heavy bass:

This is the Rod
Reel
Braid

We not talking top end tournament.. just good solid performance. Any reason NOT to go this way?

JW
Go for it! My only suggestions would be to learn to use a casting reel, and use power pro braid. The new suffix braid looks great but I have not fished it. Also, throw that jig as far back in the nastiest thickest stuff you can find, the kind of stuff you have been avoiding your whole life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
.

Okay, so I found one of those videos/ Texas Rigging, but it shows the point of the hook "buried".

I'm sure I've seen one of these before where the hook point is exposed on top.

Do do you guys only bury the point in "snaggy" environments, or do you always expose or
bury the point?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,547 Posts
It is a relatively minor distinction between the two "different" methods... I "Tex-pose" if I am using light line.
If I am using light line, I am most likely in a situation where there is less cover. In heavy cover, I use stouter line,
10# up to 25# co-polymer, depending on conditions. I am still a FIRM believer in nylon, except in specific cases. A good tinted (smoke or moss green) co-polymer such as Maxima, Berkley Big-Game, or (what I live and die by) P-Line CXX, has maximum abrasion resistance and knot strength. The moderate stretch also is a big assist when a fish surges, or at the hook-set. I hate flourocarbon, though I am most likely in a small fraternity with that opinion! :D

Concerning the popular opinion that co-polymers are un-ruly, it has much to do with the fact that they are almost all VERY CONSERVATIVELY RATED with regard to tensile strength. I have repeatedly busted P-Line 8lb. CXX at 21+ lbs. on an extremely accurate digital scale. Consider that the rated test is about 1/3rd more, conservatively. Thus 6lb. is more along the lines of 9-10ish, etc.

I would also tactfully suggest that a baitcasting rig would open new doors for you as an angler. I had many customers at Sportsman's tell em that they could not use a casting reel, and I would invite them out back for a demo. My record was 100% as of the store closing in getting these persons casting at a basic level. It is really quite simple, it just takes a *little* practice and an open mind.

SS
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top