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fished deckers saturday from 10am - 3pm and really had an outstanding day.  not a soul on the water, nice temps and no wind.  all rainbows.  probably caught 30+ fish and rolled/lost half as many.  10" all the way to a few over 18".  flow was about 47cfs, clear, but great isolated bwo and midge hatches were coming off where ever riffles were in the sun warming the water.  the trout were rising, chasing etc. caught fish on bwo extendabody size 20 and a barr emerger dropper, and a zebra midge and rs-2 sparlke wing sizes 20 and 22.  the moss was the biggest bother having to clean your flys all the time. so as long as the weather stay good, fly fishing ain't over yet.  here is a nice fat 17" rainbow my buddy caught.

 

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Great report, thats how I like to fly fish. Good Looking fish, I was goin fishing all wekend but I caught somekind of bug and have been sick as a dog since saturday morning. Man I knew it was going to be great out there.
 
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that is a nice trout, i need to get up to deckers, but next time i go there i wanna hit the canyon, i cant get anything but small ones below the canyon, and all the big ones i see have that white patch skin disease thing
 

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hmm....well that might make me think twice about where I head tomorrow. I was thinking easy fish at waterton but I might be up for the challenge. EIther way, I'll report on deckers or waterton when I return.
 

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The white patch skin disease is most likely a fungal infection called Saprolegnia. A lot of trout and salmon (and other fish) will get it when they get abrasions on their skin from spawning, or bumping against rocks, or rough handling when they are landed. If you ever look at spawning kokanee or big Pacific salmon, you'll often see it on them. In low doses they can recover from it, but in large amounts (especially on Pacific salmon and kokanee, who have suppressed immune systems by the time the spawn), it tends to be terminal. The fungal spores are everywhere, so if a fish gets a fair-sized injury, it's got a good chance of getting infected (just like you have a good chance of getting infected with bacteria if you get a good cut or scrape).

You can minimize the damage you do to fish you plan on releasing by using a wet net, making sure your hands are wet, and keeping the fish from bouncing on the ground, or rocks, or anything that might give it a scrape or scratch. Or you can perfect your mid-stream releases... ;)
 

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Nice post Doctor...very informative...thanks!!...and welcome to the site...
 
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