Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am interested in trying my luck with streamers a bit on my next trip out. Is there any action to be had on them this time of year? I thought I had heard streamers were good in the spring with high flows and cloudy water but I need to read up on it. If anyone has suggestions, let me know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,678 Posts
Streamers always work, but for me i tend to use them in the deeper holes when the water is low in late summer or in the spring when flows are high...it takes practice, but will produce some large fish if you do it right. its also a good "to-go-to" pattern for lakes..for all species.

theres an article in this months Colorado Fisherman Magazine on the topic, you should check it out. it might answer some of your questions. if not the internet and library should also be good sources of info. id read up on a bit, and them just go do it...its fun and can work well once you get the hang of it...im a big streamer fan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Here are a few things I've learned about streamer fishing the past few seasons:

You can't strip a streamer fast enough to take it away from a fish that wants to eat it.

You can't go wrong with black.

Double bunnies work.

Prey tends to flee predators by swimming downstream (don't shy away from casting upstream and stipping downstream).

A floating line may not be your best option.

Read "Modern Streamers For Trophy Trout" co-authored by Kelly Galloup.

Have fun!!

TP
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
People are always saying that you have to learn to dead drift nymphs to become really productive at catching fish. True, but after a while it feels exactly like, well, dead drifting. I want more action and I really enjoy playing with a streamer to make it look like a minnow. It's a more active and entertaining pursuit in my estimation, and if I catch a fish while doing my minnow imatation, so much the better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,678 Posts
I have to say streamer fishing is a more exciting method of fly fishing in my opinion--- theres nothing like feeling you line just suddenly stop with dead weight on the end, or seeing a large brown rushing into the shallows chasing your fly to the tip of your rod...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,601 Posts
Streamers are always an option any time of year and do produce larger than average sized fish. I have taken some of my biggest fish on Streamers. Usually a shorter leader is better for casting or you can use a sink tip. A sink tip is usually sufficient enough to get the bug down deeper, but you will find most of the time fishing steamers the fish will take close to shore or within the first few strips. I like to use my rod tip to give the fly action, then strip in the excess line after the strip, kind of like trowing a jerk bait with a spin dicker. Sometimes the strip will need to be slow (usually on slower water), but in faster water they like it fast with pauses. I usually put a good sized split shot above the tippet knot or approximately 14 to 18 inches above the fly. This will give the bug some good action on the pause as well. Spring and Fall are great times for streamers with my favorite being Fall. You will catch big fish on steamers. You can also throw double trouble or two steamers at once just like a nymph rig but with two streamers. The strike of a fish hitting a steamers is what is so fun and usually you can use heavier tippet which will allow you to put good pressure when bringing it in. I usually use 8lb Flourocarbon material as tippet. Be careful casting and I guarantee you will at some point you will experience the feeling of a cone head bugger in the back of the head. Definitely trhow some buggers this fall or even now. Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
thanks for the info guys. I am excited to try them out. I was going to try them today but was too busy catching browns on nymphs ;D

I really like fishing riffles and pockets in faster moving water, I am assuming I can use streamers in these types of water? probably with a fast action as was mentioned. I have no problem giving the streamer some life, my years of bass and pike fishing experience should help with that.

thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,678 Posts
You can fish a streamer pretty much anywhere, but the areas i usually target are the heads and tail outs of deeper pools, and also undercut banks---which tend to be my favorite areas to work. They can be hard to get your fly under (use the current to your best atvantage) but once you figure it out it can be a good producer of big fish. plan your approach to such areas carefully, and dont forget to give you fly time to sink while you mend to get it down to the proper depth. strip fast, but not so fast that your fly comes up to the surface too quickly...i like to keep it near the bottom most of the time where the fish are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,797 Posts
i saw mention of the wooly buggers but what are some other go-to streamer patterns. i have heard clouser minnows are good any others i should stock up on or learn to tie?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
i have had luck with spruce fly streamers and various Matuka patterns in different colors.A grey one has been good in the fall on the Ark. I am one of those guys that rarely does well with woolies. Also you can try Platte River specials and similar patterns like Micky Finns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,538 Posts
The old "platte river special" or platty as we call it.I also toss a muddler from time to time.Works pretty well on bigger fish.I find if the hole is real deep and fast a spinning rod and some split shot work real good to drift these patterns right in the proper zone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I'm real partial to Zonkers. I think they are great, with that rabbit fur strip wing. I like them in white or grey. I have nailed some big browns on them, particularly under undercut banks. Someone else said that they have not had great success with wooly buggers -- me too. Only a few times have I caught fish on them.
 
F

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I do really well with wooly buggers but never the store bought kind ...ive caught a bunch of fish on the ones I tie and the ones my buddy ties
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,601 Posts
Bottom line is that all steamers imitate bait fish, Sculpins, or leeches. We all have our favorites and there are hundreds of patterns, but they all work. Color, Flash, weight is all personal preference. Self tied, store baught, same thing.
 
F

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
maybe its the confidence I have with the ones my buddy ties but for me they outfish the store bought kinds at least 3 to 1
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top