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Discussion Starter #1
I'm curious about which species successfully spawn in our lakes/ponds

Personally - it seems like all the sunfish (Bluegill, SMB, LMB) seem to reproduce successfully in most lakes.

Also I'm sure carp and yellow perch spawn successfully because they are generally crowded in most lakes I fish.

I've heard mixed things on Saugeye/Walleye - that only in limited lakes they are successful

And obiously in most rivers the trout are successful as they were here before we were...

But what about all those stocker Rainbows? Do those spawn at all?
 

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Negative. That is why they cost us all so much cheddar... ;)

There may be "spawning activity" but there is very little if any successful reproduction in lakes without an inlet stream.

SS
 

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Discussion Starter #3
swimbait said:
Negative. That is why they cost us all so much cheddar... ;)

There may be "spawning activity" but there is very little if any successful reproduction in lakes without an inlet stream.

SS
So it's just an endless cycle of stocking those things?
 

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Weezy said:
swimbait said:
Negative. That is why they cost us all so much cheddar... ;)

There may be "spawning activity" but there is very little if any successful reproduction in lakes without an inlet stream.

SS
So it's just an endless cycle of stocking those things?
Basically. Thats where they get the term "put and take".
 

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Discussion Starter #5
shutupandfish said:
Weezy said:
swimbait said:
Negative. That is why they cost us all so much cheddar... ;)

There may be "spawning activity" but there is very little if any successful reproduction in lakes without an inlet stream.

SS
So it's just an endless cycle of stocking those things?

What a vicious cycle ???
Basically. Thats where they get the term "put and take".
 

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So youre telling me on the gravel redds and rocks like at Spinney where trout lay eggs with wave action none of those eggs hatch?...

How did all those fish hatch in lakes with no streams before man got here get there?...
 

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Jay said:
Not to try and discredit anyone but what are these opinions based on?
[me=Jay] [/me]
Well, I will be honest. It is based on a combination of direct observation and assimilation of a lot of second hand information.

For direct observation, we have the fact that all (or nearly all) trout will run given the opportunity. Laketrout may provide an exception to this basic rule. Rainbow trout however do not. I have observed a great many trout fry in streams and rivers, but very few in littoral zones of stillwaters. Parr, yes. But fry, no. Where are the dense clouds of fry indicating a successful spawn?

There are a great many papers written by ichthyologists concerning the failure of reproduction of various species of trout in reservoirs. There is some reproduction, but the ultimate dictator of spawning success is adequate spawning grounds, which tend to be lacking in reservoirs.

Reservoirs experience a very rapid eutrophication process in comparison to a typical natural lake. Eutrophication is the process of "aging" that takes place in a lake. Over the huge spans of time that a natural lake ages (sometimes hundreds of thousands or even millions of years) there are species that take advantage of the niches that are available. Stocks of fish will return to a single area over and over for countless generations. (Man has made note of this, to the detriment of many fish stocks.)

In a man made reservoir, this is not the case. That is not to say that there will be no spawning behavior, it is genetically hard-wired in the DNA of species. (I had a perch lay eggs in my aquarium once!) The better the spawning habitat the better a given spawn will come off. But without the conditions that these species evolved with, it is likely that the spawning ritual is only so much wasted effort.

In an effort to placate haters, I will freely admit I am a hack in pretty much every sense of the word.

I think FishDr. could render a useful perspective on the matter, as could John Ewert. Dr. Robert Benhke (not sure if I got the spelling right there) at CSU is internationally renown for his knowledge on trout. I am sure his input would be of great worth as well to anyone willing to invest the effort to contact him on the matter.

SS
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Jay said:
Not to try and discredit anyone but what are these opinions based on?
[me=Jay] [/me]
My original post is just what I think - it may not be accurate. I was honestly just guessing based on my experience with fish populations on what species spawn successfully
 

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Ewert partially addressed your question in his thread. On trout spawning in stillwaters:

"You're right about flowing water. The most important thing is that the eggs are oxygenated with fresh water. The thing is, if the conditions are just right it doesn't take very much. We have some alpine lakes with no inlet/outlet where the trout are spawning successfully, and it appears that they are doing it over small seep springs that are submerged in the lake. Same with the kokanee at Wolford - they are spawning successfully within the lake, in areas where I believe there are small seeps entering the lake below the surface. So the answer to your question is yes, they can reproduce in still water, but they do need some source of fresh water flowing over/through the eggs once they're in the gravel."

I think the default expectation is still that trout and other salmonids in general won't spawn successfully without an in or outgoing stream that they have access to. But in some instances, there is successful spawning. Spinney and Antero (and Eleven Mile) are a bit different though since they both have inlet streams for the trout to run into. These streams are relatively small for the numbers of fish that would be potential spawners--so my understanding is that there is not enough natural recruitment to sustain the fish populations that live in these reservoirs. Plus you have the whirling disease factor as long as the young fish remain in the stream...
 
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