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Discussion Starter #1
I'm just wondering if anyone has any info on the sulphur containing compound present in superglow red and especially orange powder paints. This mystery compound makes these paints very hard to work with as it reacts upon contact with water or humidity in the air to create a very aromatic substance with an incredibly strong and foul odor. This also makes use of sealcoat an absolute impossibility due to its water based nature. I would love to find a clear coat that does not react with this mystery compound or require 3-5 coats to prevent the smell. I have contacted pro-tec but they don't seem especially interested in discussing the chemical composition of these paints. Chemical analysis of a powder like these paints is too expensive atm and I would love to be able to work with these paints more easily, so any info or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I should mention that the smell is very remeniscent of sulphur dioxide and if the lure is not coated multiple times NOTHING will hit it.
 

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Looks like you stumped 'em, E.

None of the pigments used in daylight fluorescent paints contain sulphur, to my knowledge. Most are based on rather complicated polycyclic molecules which are closely guarded proprietary secrets, because they represent big money to the manufacturers. They don't stink, either.

My best guess as to what you smell is not the pigment, but something in the solvent or binder that is introduced when the ground pigment is made into paint. Unless you can find a better smelling product from a different paint manufacturer, which I suppose is possible, I think you have already hit upon the best solution, that is, multiple clear coats over the lure to seal in the smell. Drying for a long time under a cluster of infrared lamps might also help with the smell, if it's coming from the paint solvent.

Cheers, W. E.
 

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Do powders have an odor?
Due to the composition necessary to manufacture red & orange, they have a slight sulphuric odor to them .
We now have available Orange in Strontium...no odor & long glow!


Zinc Red Glow in the Dark Powder

Smell
Like all Zinc Sulfide powders, Zinc Red has a strong sulfur odor in its pigment form. This order generally subsides when mixed into a medium.

Chemical Makeup
The raw glow pigment is: Alkaline Rare Earth Metal Silicate-Zinc Sulfide Europium Doped

http://glowinc.com/detail.aspx?ID=19
 

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fischer said:
Do powders have an odor?
Due to the composition necessary to manufacture red & orange, they have a slight sulphuric odor to them .
We now have available Orange in Strontium...no odor & long glow!


Zinc Red Glow in the Dark Powder

Smell
Like all Zinc Sulfide powders, Zinc Red has a strong sulfur odor in its pigment form. This order generally subsides when mixed into a medium.

Chemical Makeup
The raw glow pigment is: Alkaline Rare Earth Metal Silicate-Zinc Sulfide Europium Doped
I assumed from the way Ephemeral's post was worded that he was referring to daylight fluorescent colors, not to glow-in-the-dark colors. They are two different things entirely. If he did mean glow in the dark colors and not the ones commonly referred to as "day-glo" colors, then, yes, some of them are sulphur compounds and sometimes phosphorus compounds.

The day-glo colors glow brightly in daylight but not necessarily in the dark, because they absorb ultraviolet light from sunlight and they re-radiate it in the visible spectrum to make the daylight colors appear brighter. Construction workers' safety vests and certain highway signs and advertising signs are examples.

The glow-in-the-dark colors absorb visible light, such as from a flashlight or other incandescent source, and store it up, and later give back the light by glowing in the dark. Although this class of pigments includes phosphorus and sulfur compounds, I have never observed them to smell really bad. They do have a smell, but not usually when mixed into paint.

In either case, I still suspect that it is the paint formulation, and not the pigment, that is causing him trouble.

W. E.
 

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W.E. I defer to your expertise, I'm just a monkey with a keyboard. :)
 

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fischer said:
W.E. I defer to your expertise, I'm just a monkey with a keyboard. :)
No, no, not trying to take any pot shots, far from it, just trying to figure out the source of the problem, is all. If we ever meet I'll buy the beers. ;D
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have only encountered this phenomenon with superglow powders. The UV blast powder has a very weak smell but it goes away once the paint is cured.
 
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