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Discussion Starter #1
there must be a reason why so many anglers prefer the surgeons knot for connecting two pieces off tippet. However, I have always had an issue with this knot for one reason. No matter how many times I do it, the end product never seems to lay strait. I'm trying to help you visualize this. When I hold the upper section of my leader and let the piece I just ajoined hang freely it always has a hinged 150 degree angle on it. To counter this I developed a knot of my own which has never failed. I form a clinch knot with one end of the tippet and then run the piece I am connecting through the loop formed by the first clinch. WIth the piece I am ajoining I form another clinch knot and then snug the two interweaved clinch knots together to ajoin the two tippets. When I'm done, the leader will hang with no hinge at a perfect 180 degree angle. I see no reason to stop using this knot other then the fact so many people prefer the surgeons knot...I want to know if anyone else experiences this same hinged effect that I always seem to.
 

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I frequently notice that my surgeon's knots will be 10 or 20 degrees off of a straight line, however it has never caused me any mental distress because I use them for other purposes, like adding a mono leader to a braid superline.

Some people advocate joining mono lines with a double uni-knot used in the same way you just described for a clinch knot. Both ways have one potential drawback: when mono breaks, it almost always breaks at the sharpest bend, or smallest radius bend, in the knot. When joining lines this way, you have two very tight-radius bends -- the same diameter as the line you are using. If this causes you no concern, well then go ahead and knock yourself out. :) :)

The blood knot is another line-joining knot that comes out very straight, and it's quite strong.
 
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skywindrotts said:
I put a perfect loop at the end of my leader then use a clinch knot to attach my tippet to it. Works really well for me.
How do you tie that perfect loop, I've heard its a good knot but I've never seen one.
 

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windknot said:
How do you tie that perfect loop, I've heard its a good knot but I've never seen one.
For some strange reason, the instructions for tying this knot are always more complicated than the knot itself. It's a good knot, never slips, and with practice you can tie one in about two seconds.

Try this and see if it makes sense to you. (Note: the second loop is usually larger than shown in the picture.)

http://www.killroys.com/knots/perfecti.htm


Edited:
Okay, maybe three seconds.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
yea the perfection loop has become pretty standard in ajoining leader to fly line. However, my question about the surgeon's knot involved tippet material being connected
 

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TopSlugger4 said:
yea the perfection loop has become pretty standard in ajoining leader to fly line. However, my question about the surgeon's knot involved tippet material being connected
I think your objection to the knot coming off at a slight angle is built into the knot, due to the fact that the twists in the knot are all on one side of the loop.
 

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Topslugger - I use that same type of double clinch knot to attach leaders and it hasn't failed me yet. For joining two relatively similar sizes of tippet, the knot which you described (I believe it's actually a blood knot?) is great. It lays out nice and straight and is extremely tough. For joining one larger length of leader to a smaller one, though, the double clinch isn't a very good choice. I've seen guys tie nail knots for this purpose, but other than joining my fly line to my butt leader, I've never found much purpose in tying a huge piece of mono or leader to one that is exageratedly small, and haven't had to use the nail knot for any other purpose.
 
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