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I have heard that if a fish swallows a hook and you can?t get it out, to cut the line and leave it in them. The Hook will dissolve in a few days.

Is this true?
 

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maybe not a few days. Maybe a week or so. It is better to cut the line rather than to try to pull the hook out if it is deep.
 

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Like2Fish said:
The Hook will dissolve in a few days. 

Is this true?
I'm not too sure if the hook will dissolve....
 

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It will rust away, after a while, and the fish has a better chance than pulling its guts out trying to free the hook.
 

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But, wouldn't that take quite some time? ??? ?
 

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I really think that would be rough on any trout. Its why I like flyfishing if my intention is to catch and release.
 

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I read alot of fishing magazines. I have read in them, and heard from lots of fisherman that they (hooks) do dissolve in about 7 days (or so). I always cut the line (as close to hook as possable) when it's swallowed. However, practicaly the same article was in either F&S or Outdoor Life. It said that they won't dissolve, so who knows. I like to belive they do. I have caught fish w/ hooks in them that were pretty rusted?
 

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Since I fish trout alot I use a couple different hook removers to remove hooks that are swallowed deep.


I use the first one mainly for trouble hooks as it seems to work best, however if I feel I'm not going be able to get it out without hurting the fish I cut the line. The second one works great for most of my needs except the trouble hooks, and you can usually pick them up for about 1$.
 

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I have heard that the hooks will rust/dissolve out in 7 -10 days too. I don't know how true that is. I have also heard that that time frame is only true on hooks in the gullet and stomach and that the digestive acids work on them. I personally believe, that the fish probably has a better chance of survival if I don't fight to get deep hook out. It seems all I do is make i bleed more. So Unless i can remove a deep hook fairly easily, I leave it in rather than virtually kill it removing a hook.

Dan
 

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From what I have learned in college and from researching the subject for years, about 60 - 70% of fish that are deeply hooked survive when the hook is cut, as long as the fish is not heavily bleeding. Most so called stainless steel hooks do not rust out rapidly, but the slow breakdown produces caustic chemicals that help release the hook.
How often a fish swallows a hook is not really related to what you are fishing with, but HOW you fish it. If you choose to fish bait, use very sharp hooks and keep the rod in your hands, and in rivers use the drift method. Done this way, 90% of the fish should be hooked in the mouth, lip, or jaw. And if 10% of these fish were deeply hooked, and if all fish that swallowed a hook died, the mortality would be 10%, or about 5% higher than flies or lures. However if half of all fish that swallow the hook survive, your mortality rate is 5%, the same as flies or lures. This is why for the most part I do not support flies and lures only regulations, except on small heavily fished rivers or small heavily fished lakes. They are basically not needed on any large body of water regardless of pressure.
Usually when properly fishing bait, 90 - 95% of fish you hook should be hooked in the mouth and not the esophagus or stomach.
Just regardless of what you are fishing, when the fish has the bait, set the hook.

Tyler
 

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the hook will desolve, infact last year I caught 1 with a hook in it and it was still feeding
 

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Jimmy said:
infact last year I caught 1 with a hook in it and it was still feeding
I've done that before too. The line also looked fairly old, and the hook looked about ready to fall out. It definitely works. The only study I've ever read (I'll try and find where I read it) said 56% of trout in the study released when the line was cut lived.
 
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I'd call this one a sketchy topic. I have snagged old lines where the lure has obviously been resting on the bottom for quite some time and the hook its still completely intact. Even on trout I have pretty good luck getting them to swim away using my leatherman and pushing the hook down a bit farther, twisting it slightly, and slowly pulling it back out. Even on small trout at Sylvan Lake I was able to release several stockers that didn't hesitate in swimming right back out. I didn't see any floating so I guess it worked. This is also a very quick way to get the hook out.
 
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