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Discussion Starter #1
All the talk about swimbaits has me wondering. What type of rods are the most popular? What are folks here in our great state throwing? (I noticed rivrunners new rod was matched up with a revo?) Just curious. And no, this is not in any way an advertisement! ;D
 

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I throw a 7'9" St Croix Legend heavy power, fast action swimbait-specific rod rated for 1-4oz. It has a Revo Toro casting reel spooled with either 25# XT mono or 65# Fireline Braid (not original fused Fireline) depending on the cover - in open water I like the mono, but the braid saves money around heavy/abrasive cover. CL
 

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I use a okuma guide series 7'11" think it is a heavy... 1-6 oz
I did have it paired with a curado 300d but didn't really care for the reel. Now when I use it I slap on my Calcutta 200tedc. Talk about being able to cast a bait!
 

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I don't fish with swimbaits, more due to the cost than anything else, but along with the rod rating, what are the size of baits(weight) that are being thrown on those rods? I may look into setting myself up with a rod and a few baits.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
HookNLine said:
How about a spin rod? Which one can i toss big swimbaits with?
Just keep on learning that sweet baitcaster combo you purchased. Consistently, throwing that baitcaster will provide results. Big baits just dont do well on spinning tackle (even with braid). The options as far as spinning tackle would be a huge combo on almost a surf rod style. Ive seen it done in the south for stripers, but its not very user friendly.
 

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I throw my swimbaits on the Okuma Guide select big bait series rods. They are relatively inexpensive ($110) and they come in MH, H, and XH ratings. You might also look at some of the Dobyns and Lamiglas rods, as they have pretty big followings in California.
 

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I use two different rods. For baits up to 2.5 oz, i use the 7'6" MH Okuma Swimbait rod. It is rated from 1/2oz to 5 oz, but no way would i ever throw a 5 oz bait on there. Picked this one on the recommendation of FishDr and the fact it is cheap. Think I got it for under 100 when there was a sale. I throw it with a curado 200 with 65lb braid, will be switching to the 300 when I have the money just for the line capacity of it. At times, i can get that spool pretty low with the heavier baits. Also, this bait actually works for deep diving crankbaits. not with the braid tho. i also have a pike rod that i use for heavier baits in the 4+ oz range. and i use a cardiff 400 with 25lb mono on it. its heavy, but i paid about 140 for the combo and it works just fine, you have to get use to the round baitcasters though, it's a bit different.

As an additional note, throwing swimbaits on spinning rods is wrong. lol. it just doesn't work right. you don't have the winching power that you do on a baitcaster.
 

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I don't fish with swimbaits any more, all I do is fly fish...I should change my screen name... maybe swambait. :D

a good swimbait rod will have the following qualities-

1) length... 8' is standard, and if you are not interested in fishing tournaments, longer is not a bad idea. (there is an arbitrary rule in B.A.S.S preventing anglers from using rods longer than 8'... thanks, Dee...)

2) you will want to get a casting setup. unless you are Chris Wolfgram. and you are not. so get a casting setup.

3) 300 or 400 size reels (Shimano terms) are the norm. this will let you keep a bit of line on the arbor after a bomb of a cast. this is VERY important, as you may get bit at the start of the retrieve and need to pick up line with a quickness. If you use a 200 size reel and dump all the line on the cast, you are sorta sunk, spinning the handle like a hand blender, watching the fish shake loose of your sissy little hookset.

4) the rod should have the power in the butt to dead lift a cinderblock. it should have a longer than normal rear grip that allows the angler to tuck the grip into the crook of the arm and swing the torso in a twisting motion to generate force on the hookset. muskie guys are big on this, trust me, it helps a lot. I dont care how perfect a blank is, if it does not have a long handle it is not a swimbait rod. some manufacturers still dont get this.

5) the rod should have great power in the butt, but a moderate tip. think in terms of a crankbait rod that has been lifting weights. pool-cues are useful for muskie anglers fishing jerkbaits weighing 16oz or more, but we fish baits for bass that weigh a lot less on average. 1-4oz. is normal. a soft tip lets the rod track head shakes when hooked up, and lets the rod do more of the work when casting. believe me, this matters. If you plan to fish a lot of wakebaits and topwater style swimbaits, the ones that look like godzilla cranbaits, consider a true parabolic rod, a slow stick. again, one with some real power, but more of a "fiberglassy" action. (good fiberglass, not Ugly Stick® fiberglass. yes kids, there is a difference)

as far as reels go, I would recommend a Shimano Calcutta. just my 2¢. you can get them used on Ebay if the price is a big issue. that is also where I got most of my baits.

as far as baits go, do you notice the baits in FishDr's avatar? get those.

my most productive baits have been the Matt bass, trout, and gill (in that order), the M.S, Slammer, the 6 and 9" Castaic original, and the 8" Huddleston Deluxe in the 5 and 12ROF. I also use Rago baits, and I build harbaits. it is not difficult, and I would encourage you to try it.

cheers.
 

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Everyone i talked to said throwing big swimbaits with spinning rod is wrong, but i was out yesterday morning and i meet a fellow doing just that and he caught some HUGE wipers doing it. I just forgot to ask him what rod he was using he was throwing with a 4000 series spin reel. It can be done and produce i just don't know which rod to get, and his rod was not a surf rod.
 

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of course it CAN be done. you CAN kill a moose with a .22 calibre handgun, but many choose not to attempt to do so for obvious reasons.

there is just a LOT less torque in a spinning reel, that is all. you will work twice, three times as hard. why not just use the right tool for the job? the reason is the power.

if you are deathly afraid of casting reels, a spinning reel will work better than a fly reel...

just breakin' your balls a little. Fish Chris does put a big hurt on 'em with the spinning reel, but, man, that guy is out there! ;D

Cheers!
 

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8' Tigerodz custom build to my specs paired with a TD Luna with 20# Trilene 100% for Hudds and sinking baits. 8' Kistler Mg paired with a Revo Toro spooled with 25# XT for floating baits and wake baits. I will swap the reel with a STX spooled with 50# PP when in a situation where I want braid.
 

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I don't agree with the statement that a spinning reel isn't powerful enough to handle either the bait itself or the catch. A large spinning reel is a very common tool for catching very powerful fish in salt water. I've personally landed lots of big groupers (reef donkeys) and amber jacks on large spinning reels, and they are still more common in salt water bait fishing than casting tackle.

The problem with spinning reels for swimbaits is casting; holding the line with your finger during the cast is difficult under the loads generated by powerful rods and heavy baits. At very least, accuracy is lost. If braid is deployed, the caster might sustain injury to the line finger pretty easily. I'd consider a glove if spinning tackle is the preference. Just my 2 cents... CL
 

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I just started throwing swimbaits a couple months ago and wanted to try it w/o investing too much (before i knew if i liked it) so I found a Quantum PT tournament swimbait rod from ebay that can throw 1-5 oz baits, and a cheap abu garcia ocean casting reel, together the pair weren't much over $100. Over the winter I plan to upgrade because i really do like it, but that is a route to try if you're not sure you'll be into it.
 

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Not at all. I'm saying that spinning reels have more than enough torque to handle anything you can possibly hope to catch swimbaiting around here. I prefer casting gear in this application, but I don't think spinning gear should be ruled out if someone isn't comfortable with casting gear. CL
 

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Fishful Thinker said:
Not at all. I'm saying that spinning reels have more than enough torque to handle anything you can possibly hope to catch swimbaiting around here. I prefer casting gear in this application, but I don't think spinning gear should be ruled out if someone isn't comfortable with casting gear. CL
Any suggestions on a rod, exculding a huge surf rod?
 
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