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Really new to fly fishing and have read conflicting opinions on strike indicators. Just wanted to get everyone's opinion here... thingamabobber vs yarn for a strike indicator?
 

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Personally (key word there) I don't think the thingamobobber can match the sensitivity of yard so I still use yarn when nymphing. The thingamobobber is tough to beat however when fishing scuds or chromies suspended below it on the Delanys, Spinney, or Antero because they do not become water logged. I have never had any issues connecting either of them to leaders. HTH
 

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Johnny Rubber said:
Does securing it to your line cause any issues?
Yea it will kink your leader but it's like 30 lb test. I've never had any issues. My leaders usually last me months.
 

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goldentrout17 said:
Personally (key word there) I don't think the thingamobobber can match the sensitivity of yard so I still use yarn when nymphing. The thingamobobber is tough to beat however when fishing scuds or chromies suspended below it on the Delanys, Spinney, or Antero because they do not become water logged. I have never had any issues connecting either of them to leaders. HTH
x2 - my thoughts as well
 

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I use a Thingambobber...but that might be because Imanotaverygoodflyfisher?? :-\ :D

D.J.
 
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Indicators are only a temporary crutch, dont get used to using one except on lakes where fishing 15-20+ft is pretty normal.

Yarn - before you even get a new one wet, soak it in a gel floatant, revivex, or other waterproofer for clothing for a day or two, it will almost never sink and only needs a refresher once in a while.

Thinga's - Use the tiny white or glow ones, both resemble either natural bubbles or ice on the water. You think a big pink indicator is stealthy ?? For the bright ones, color the bottom half a natural earthy color so it becomes a bit of floating debris and not a flourescent warning sign.

So, dont get used to using an indicator. Instead, while learning only, watch an area 3-4ft around the indicator, your flies are not directly below it, ever. By watching around an indicator, your eyes will detect fish strikes faster ( flashes, rises, winks...) than the indicator will. Most times, a fish will have taken and spat the fly before ( if ever) the indicator moves. I've watched fish eat a trailing fly a few times and spit and my dry never even twitched.
Indicators on rivers are best for suspending flies "in the zone" if fishing 5-6ft+ but shallower than that just high stick or use a dry as an indicator, youll see fish just fine in water less than 6ft.
On lakes an indicator is a must for suspending flies over weed beds or shelves, and no need to really watch them cuz the fish usually take and run hard !
 

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Silent_Light said:
Indicators are only a temporary crutch, dont get used to using one except on lakes where fishing 15-20+ft is pretty normal.

Yarn - before you even get a new one wet, soak it in a gel floatant, revivex, or other waterproofer for clothing for a day or two, it will almost never sink and only needs a refresher once in a while.

Thinga's - Use the tiny white or glow ones, both resemble either natural bubbles or ice on the water. You think a big pink indicator is stealthy ?? For the bright ones, color the bottom half a natural earthy color so it becomes a bit of floating debris and not a flourescent warning sign.

So, dont get used to using an indicator. Instead, while learning only, watch an area 3-4ft around the indicator, your flies are not directly below it, ever. By watching around an indicator, your eyes will detect fish strikes faster ( flashes, rises, winks...) than the indicator will. Most times, a fish will have taken and spat the fly before ( if ever) the indicator moves. I've watched fish eat a trailing fly a few times and spit and my dry never even twitched.
Indicators on rivers are best for suspending flies "in the zone" if fishing 5-6ft+ but shallower than that just high stick or use a dry as an indicator, youll see fish just fine in water less than 6ft.
On lakes an indicator is a must for suspending flies over weed beds or shelves, and no need to really watch them cuz the fish usually take and run hard !
That's gold right there! Thanks SL!
 

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If you want to use an indicator as such and not have it suspend your fly (bobber) I like to use the umpqua roll ons and cut them in small strips and use 2 or 3 of those and they sink well with the line and are easy to see under water...

I do that primarily in waters like the pan where I want to be stealth and long casts are not the rule.
 

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Silent_Light said:
Indicators are only a temporary crutch, dont get used to using one except on lakes where fishing 15-20+ft is pretty normal.

Yarn - before you even get a new one wet, soak it in a gel floatant, revivex, or other waterproofer for clothing for a day or two, it will almost never sink and only needs a refresher once in a while.

Thinga's - Use the tiny white or glow ones, both resemble either natural bubbles or ice on the water. You think a big pink indicator is stealthy ?? For the bright ones, color the bottom half a natural earthy color so it becomes a bit of floating debris and not a flourescent warning sign.

So, dont get used to using an indicator. Instead, while learning only, watch an area 3-4ft around the indicator, your flies are not directly below it, ever. By watching around an indicator, your eyes will detect fish strikes faster ( flashes, rises, winks...) than the indicator will. Most times, a fish will have taken and spat the fly before ( if ever) the indicator moves. I've watched fish eat a trailing fly a few times and spit and my dry never even twitched.
Indicators on rivers are best for suspending flies "in the zone" if fishing 5-6ft+ but shallower than that just high stick or use a dry as an indicator, youll see fish just fine in water less than 6ft.
On lakes an indicator is a must for suspending flies over weed beds or shelves, and no need to really watch them cuz the fish usually take and run hard !
What Silent said. learn not to use one and your catch rate will increase!
 

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I like what Silent stated - There is a time and place for each approach but as Silent put it, use it to learn and go from there. I know I use mine more than I should but it does help me see the strike.

Koldkut should ring in before long with some old-man jokes...
 

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In a Field and Stream article a year or so ago, Kirk Deeter reported on results of scuba diving observations (by Jack Dennison, I believe) of trout reacting to nymph fly fishing techniques and said the solid foam indicators spooked the trout when they hit the water, but the yarn ones didn't. I've used the foam indicators more when fishing in run off conditions when water clarity is only a foot or two and have done well so, perhaps yarn is the better idea under clear and low water conditions.

On still water, you'll likely want to have a quick release or slip strike type indicator, i.e., one that slips free from it's position once a fish is on and then slips down your leader, so that when you're fishing deeper than, say, 8 or 9 feet, you can bring the fish in close enough to net, especially if you're in a float tube. Google slip strike indicator and you should find some info on them.

For what it's worth.
 
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