Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

In your opinion, which method produces the tastiest turkey?

  • Deep-Frying

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Grilling

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Roasting

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Smoking

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,035 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know I'm early, but since I may be absent from the forum catching up on several meaningful PM's in my box, let me be the very first to wish you all "Happy Thanksgiving!" If your family is anything like mine, it's easy to forget that so many basic things that we enjoy every day (our health, people who love us, good food to eat, a warm bed, etc.) are for many others only a dream. Many times when I have started to become discouraged at my lot in life, I will then see a person in a wheelchair, or hear about someone who has cancer, or talk with a guy whose wife has left him, etc. It brings a much needed balance to my outlook.




Obviously, the traditional Thanksgiving dinner features turkey, and I for one think a perfectly prepared turkey is very hard to beat. But I am debating which method to use this time around, so I thought I'd ask the trusty forum:

Among the different options/methods you have tried in preparing a Thanksgiving turkey, which in your experience has produced the most wonderful results?

A couple years ago I deep-fried mine for the first time (and loved it) -- but my wife likes the aroma of roasting turkey wafting throughout the house on Thanksgiving, and I can understand that too.

There are some terrific cooks on our forum. Please don't let me down, gang! :p ;D (I hope you'll not only vote, but comment!)

God bless you all, Hop
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,879 Posts
Thanksgiving is probably my favorite Holiday...I love frying turkeys and am convinced that it's the way to go...Mo' Juicy...

But since this make's my eighth Thanksgiving with the troops Im going to go to Pizza Hut...I'm tired of standing in a line 200 deep...I also have a problem with the labor force wearing feathers and junk in their caps...I dont think they like wearing that stuff anyway...

I think Im going to be able to fry a bird next year...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,844 Posts
Roast it Martha Stewart style... Been doin it like that for four years now and wont change... my family will hang me if I do. I like the deep fried, but not as much as the baked. Brining is a must for a perfect bird IMO... I will try using a roasting oven this year to free up the big oven. I have been told they do a better job, but I am worried...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,509 Posts
Heloise Hop strikes again...nice poll...roasting...and Ovey is right...brining...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
Brining and then roasting (to 150F, thats right 150F, Pull from the oven and rest is the key to a perfect turkey(meats carry over cook about 10 degrees once removed from the heat (also turkey do not carry salmonella the same way chickens do so the need to cook the turkey past 160F is not neccesary))).

Also Basting through out the process ensures that any juices that run out of the turkey have the opportunity to be reabsorbed during cooking.

And if you are really worried about having a super moist turkey breast then remove when done roasting, remove the turkey and invert it onto a cutting board to rest (so the breast side is down). By resting the turkey breast side down when the juices start to redistribute, gravity will pull most of the juices into the breast (now you may lose some of the crispyness of the skin if done this way).

A fresh turkey if possible is the way to go, free range organic even better, but spendy. If using a frozen turkey make sure to thaw the turkey completely in advancce to ensure smooth even cooking.


Happy Thanksgiving to all and relish the company that you have during this time of year!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,273 Posts
chefaaron said:
Brining and then roasting (to 150F, thats right 150F, Pull from the oven and rest is the key to a perfect turkey(meats carry over cook about 10 degrees once removed from the heat (also turkey do not carry salmonella the same way chickens do so the need to cook the turkey past 160F is not neccesary))).

Also Basting through out the process ensures that any juices that run out of the turkey have the opportunity to be reabsorbed during cooking.

And if you are really worried about having a super moist turkey breast then remove when done roasting, remove the turkey and invert it onto a cutting board to rest (so the breast side is down). By resting the turkey breast side down when the juices start to redistribute, gravity will pull most of the juices into the breast (now you may lose some of the crispyness of the skin if done this way).

A fresh turkey if possible is the way to go, free range organic even better, but spendy. If using a frozen turkey make sure to thaw the turkey completely in advancce to ensure smooth even cooking.


Happy Thanksgiving to all and relish the company that you have during this time of year!
Great points. I agree about the 150F! No need for the 180F that lots of folks cook to. I will second the fact that the meat continue to cook for at least 10 min. after removing from heat. One more point to add, DON'T poke or cut into it to early. Keep all the juices in! I have a Traeger smoker that I like to use for the Yardbird! I brine it for 5hrs, than smoke it for about 5 hrs. Love it. Happy Thanksgiving day to everyone!




Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,035 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
chefaaron said:
Brining and then roasting (to 150F, that's right 150F, Pull from the oven and rest is the key to a perfect turkey(meats carry over cook about 10 degrees once removed from the heat (also turkey do not carry salmonella the same way chickens do so the need to cook the turkey past 160F is not necessary))).

Also basting throughout the process ensures that any juices that run out of the turkey have the opportunity to be reabsorbed during cooking.

And if you are really worried about having a super moist turkey breast then remove when done roasting, remove the turkey and invert it onto a cutting board to rest (so the breast side is down). By resting the turkey breast side down when the juices start to redistribute, gravity will pull most of the juices into the breast (now you may lose some of the crispyness of the skin if done this way).

A fresh turkey if possible is the way to go, free range organic even better, but spendy. If using a frozen turkey make sure to thaw the turkey completely in advance to ensure smooth even cooking.
I wasn't planning on posting again before Thanksgiving, but Aaron, your post was so good I just had to respond and tell you that my wife (a swell cook) read it and thought it was excellent! In fact we decided to try to follow it this year and are going out today to get our brine (thanks Oyey, also). My wife strongly agrees with you (& Jim) that there is no need to 'cook the bird to death' at high temperatures like so many do.

May I stick in one more question?



Which wines do you feel best complement such a turkey? Priscilla & I like to buy Colorado wines, and were thinking of a Riesling. Good choice?

Thanks again everyone. Such nice responses. Was hoping 'Kitchen Kenny' would also ring in, since he always seems to have something good cooking over his way. You can almost smell it over the forum. ;)

Blessings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,877 Posts
Back in the old days, I always thought a nice Sauterne went well with turkey, but I confess it's been a while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,844 Posts
Hop, Great post.... and Chefaaron, thanks for all the expert tips... I have a feeling your handle is appropriate.

Hop, My wife and I love the Reisling from the Abbey in Canon City.. You can get it lots of places... it is a little spendy, but very worth it... one of our favorites, and the first that came to mind to compliment this meal, was surprised when your first choice was reisling... good un!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
Thank you guys for the praise! I am a professional Chef and love helping interested cooks progress their skill set and try new things. I also am a certified Sommelier so wine is very important to me. So for those that may be interested in wine pairings for the Turkey day here are a few:

Whites:

The most classic is Dry Riesling (why?) - Dry rieslings have a small ammount of sweetness left in them so the sweet apple-y flavor of a riesling pairs well with the very savory flavor of the turkey, just like the cranberry sauce and sweet potatoes. whats nice about Rieslings is that you can find them inexpensively ($5-$20) and the alcohol level is low so you can enjoy multiple glasses and not be trashed. Look for "Kabinett" on the label if you are buying a German Riesling (this denotes the sweetness level) or if buying non-German look for a Riesling that has higher that 7% alcohol (the lower the alcohol content the sweeter the wine(for the most part))

Some fun alternatives to Riesling are Viognier (apricots, white peach, jasmine), Gewurtztraminer (spicy apple, pear), Dry Muscat (tropical fruits, spice) and Semillon (Peachy, honey (One of the grapes that make Sauternes))

Reds:

The most classic is Pinot Noir (Why?) – Pinot noir is one of the smoother fruitier reds that can be anywhere from light to heavy. Strawberries, fresh cherries, root beer, cocoa and light raspberry are some of the most common descriptors for Pinot Noir. Like the Riesling the fruitiness of this wine pairs well with the savory flavor of the Turkey and for that matter the rest of the fixings. Because Pinot Noir is less tannic (that woody mouth puckering dryness) the wine doesn’t as much compete with but instead compliment the meal. Pinot Noir unfortunately is a very finicky grape and cost more to grow and turn into wine so they are more expensive (you shouldn’t spend less than $10 on a bottle of Pinot Noir to get a decent one, but not more than $30 for Thanksgiving). Look for Pinot Noirs from Santa Barbara County, Carneros, or Oregon.

Some fun alternatives to Pinot Noir are Gamay Beaujolais (very similar to Pinot Noir but much lighter, strawberries and rose blossom), Shiraz from Australia (much fruitier than most with Blueberry, black raspberry and spices), and Monastral from Spain (jammy fruits, pepper, Raspberry candies).

Bottom line with any of these recommendations is pick and drink what “YOU” like with Turkey and Turkey day, cause it is you drinking it not me. HaHa! These are some suggestions of what might make the experience better.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top