Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
317 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I typically only fish one fly because I simply get tired of my line getting all tangled up when a two fly setup goes bad. But, I understand why a two fly setup can be effective. I was wondering what method you guys like best and why.

For me, I typically like to just hang my second fly off the shank of the hook from the first fly (first fly usually being something on the surface, and the second being an emerger of that first fly). I find this method causes the least amount of problems with tangles and in windy conditions. Plus, I think it is easy to snip off the trailing fly if I want to just fish the primary fly (like if the fish start to rise really good and I want to improve my dry fly presentation).

The other method I have used is to leave a long tail (6"-8" or so) off my leader/tippet knot. One fly goes off this tail, then the second one goes at the end of the tippet like normal. I think this setup has some advantage as far as presentation (your dropper comes down stream ahead of your top fly, or at least that's how I set it up), but I have nothing but problems with it from a tangled standpoint, so I rarely do it this way.

So tell me how you like to rig up a dual fly setup, and how you avoid tangles. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
I usually run two flies, when legal, coming from the east that has not always been the case.
Anyway, most of the time it's a dry dropper, covering more of the water column and indicator shy fish don't mind a big ol' stimi going over them. Try it on the DS; has made all the difference for me. Also don't forget a dry/dry, big and flashy up front with an emerger or a natural in the back or just something plain jane like an adams or EHC in the rear.

Early season and Fall and Winter Double nymph rigs or double streamer. Something heavy to get it down and something smaller and more natural looking. Swinging or stripping a brace of classic wets has also served me well brookies in Co are sucketrs for a pair of alexandras, and the browns in the Ark love professors and dark spruces.

As far as tangles the less windy the better, thats all the help I have for that one.

Have a Good 'Urn,
bones
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,039 Posts
I fish 2 flies 100% of the time but I never use dries so I can't help you there. Second fly tied to the bend of the hook of the first fly works well.

Regarding tangles: roll casting is your friend with multiple flies. If I must back cast it's a one and done (zero false casting).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,561 Posts
Had 2 and 3 fly rigs and had 0 tangles yesterday. X2 on roll casting. If you don't know how to do it, then learn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,269 Posts
I end up fishing three flies most of the time. I go bend to eye or slight variation of that for dry rigs, nymph rigs and combinations of the two. Smooth casting and dropping to a sidearm or 3/4 cast can help reduce tangling. Flourocarbon helps reduce tangles too.

Yo COCarp, where'd you go Fishing? Do any good?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
I always use the tandem rig. Lately at Antero been using a wolly -streamer set-up with the weighted fly first[wolly] trailed by the streamer 3-4ft behind with 3x tippet. Feel this gives the impression of bait chasin bait and triggers the strike. Avoid the false casts and very few tangles when tied bend to eye keepin the wind at your back or side. Also with the tandem rig if 1 fly gets weeds the other is usually clean. Can be very effective in the salt on reds and trout. Get bent-Vin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,386 Posts
When I nymph I usually have three flies on about 16 inches apart tied right to the shank. I like a BIG dry with a couple of nymphs trailing whe I fish the hopper dropper setup. As for why, the more food I can put in the drift the better IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
Always 2 flies, never 3. Tie to hook bend, 14-16" of flourocarbon tippet material.

Bigger fly up top, go down 1 tippet size and smaller fly for trailing/second fly.

Roll cast all day long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
more and more using one fly only for dries, nymphs double up and roll cast letting the current load the rod for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
317 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Sounds like my problem then is probably not roll casting enough when using multi-fly setups. Good to know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
2 fles on rivers and 3 flies on lakes works for me. Trailing fly tied to bend of hook above. I like to use a Uni-knot ( also called Ducan Loop). You van pinch it with your fingernails and pull on it and it will open up allowing you to take if off the top fly or flies so you can change hat one, slip it back on tighten it up and your back in action.

As to casting, I use a softer rod so it ends up with more open loop also side am casting works. Cant your right arm about 20 degrees to the right and more if the wind is coming at you from the right. Make sure you pause long enough on your backcast to let your line straight out (wait for the slight tug) before you forward cast. You can aslo do what they used to call Australian cast which you bring you backcast back with the rod almost paralell to the ground then rotate the rod to almost verticle while the line is staightening behind you then forwards cast( thiswill help open theloop and make it so your loop is not verticle).
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
2 flies on lakes, generally 3 on rivers. Big nasty dry on top hanging a couple droppers, one for an attractor/weight the other a dominant bug at the time.

Reguarding rigging "droppers (tag ends) - the reason you are tangling up is you are probably using the tag end of the lower section of tippet instead of the upper tag. Once you tie on tippett you have two tags - one pointing down the other pointing up. use the one pointing up ( the upper tippet section) you'll see right away that this tag end forces the line up and away from your leader. If you use the section hanging down - it will just twist all around the leader.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,386 Posts
I am not sure if someone has mentioned this but with two and three fly rigs I usually go down in strength on tippet. Say three at the top then 4 flouro and then 5 flouro for example. If you don't you will lose a ton of flies. You probably already knew this but if not it will save you from rerigging every time you snag up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
I use a three fly rig. I started long ago with two and as my casting improved I moved to three. Typically I start with an attractor fly like an egg or san juan worm. Something that my prey may not take but will definitely see. Behind it tied from the bend 16" to 24" is a fly I knew to be effective on my last outing or a traditional pattern for that body of water. On the last fly I can experiment and change frequently without changing the rest of the rig. If you get frustrated with knots get over it and keep working on your cast. If it's really windy tying three descending by size can help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,039 Posts
smellzalilfishee said:
Tangler, Why don't you use dries? Just curious because when fish are on the surface it is some of the most exciting trout fishing you can do.
To be honest I hardly ever see consistent dry feeding activity in Colorado.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,844 Posts
Three flies 80% of the time (the other 20% is single dry or single streamer)... as you become a better caster, the knots will decrease. I don't roll cast nearly as much as I back cast and I don't have a ton of issues, but I used to, as with anything, practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Big ugly stimi on top so my poor old eyes can follow it, 20in. dropper from the bend of the stimi one size smaller tippet, then my nymph. I tend to get more line tangles if I don't pay attention to weights of the individual flies. I like the nymph just a tad lighter than the dry, adjusted for size. If that makes any sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Always 3 flies when nymphing. 1st is an attractor or bright fly to see when sight fishing. Usually a worm or egg or pats rubber leg. Then a fly to match the hatch then a midge du jour, or emerger.
Two or three with drys. Usually a easy to see bigger fly a smaller fly and a dropper or film fly.
My favorite fly of the year so far is the rainbow warior. Has caught a lot of fish this winter and spring.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top