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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I inherited a vintage True Temper fishing rod from my grandfather.

The last I checked it still had the original price tag on it.

It has a case that has protected it for years.

Unfortunately my parents sold the reel on ebay not realizing the rod was hidden away in the shed.

I've hung onto it for years but figure some collector might appreciate it more.

I have a tackle box full of unused vintage lures with original boxes and even vintage catalogs in new condition but I am going to keep those and put in a glass case in my office some day.

Looking to trade for a low profile baitcast reel or medium/medium light spinning rod.


I'm not really interested in selling outright.

Sorry for the delay in posting pics but here they are.

Original price tag included. $22.50 back then, must've been a decent rod!

The yellow string on the handle is what originally attached the price tag.

The action feels comparable to the Eagle Claw Featherlight

























 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Photos have been added.

A little history lesson from: http://www.fishingtalks.com/true-temper-rods-871.html

The True Temper story started back in 1808, when a blacksmith named Alexander Miller ran a small company called the Old Stone Shop. He made axes, h oes, nails and anything else that could be forged out of iron until sometime in the early 1830’s. When the company was acquired by Lyman Batcheller and sons, they began forging a variety of agricultural forks. In 1902, Batcheller & Sons joined 16 other forging companies to form The American Fork and H oe Company, located in Cleveland, Ohio.

Sometime around 1925, American Fork and H oe Co. started making fishing rods. Back then, most rods were made of bamboo, yet there were a few steel rod makers out there. However, they were tubular and had a seam in them that made the action stiff and the rod weak. AF&H got an idea from fencing foils and came out with a square, solid steel bait casting rod called the ‘Trophy’. This was the first soft action rod that also had strength. It was made of forged and tempered steel and the guides were wrapped on with fine copper wire, which was then tinned over. It had a spiral locking reel band and finger hook and was in black enamel.

Although it was introduced in 1925, it was not patented until sometime later. The rod has two patent numbers on it, one is for the design #80990 filed on August 22, 1927, and granted April 15, 1930. The second patent # 1755159 was filed on May 9, 1927, also issued on April 15, 1930. The rod was an instant success, this started a whole new trend in fishing rods.

Over the years, American Fork and H oe Co. developed and patented many rod designs. In the early thirties, they developed the seamless tubular metallic fishing rod. Prior to this invention, tubular rods had been made of tubular sections, each section having a longitudinal seam either brazed or open. Due to the seam construction, these rod were unbalanced and heavy at the rod tip.

About the same time, American Fork and H oe Co. developed the infamous Speedlock rod handle patent number 2102237 applied for on November 30, 1936, and issued on December 14, 1937. On the inside of the reel seat is engraved ‘A True Temper product Genova, Ohio’. At this time, True Temper was only a trade name. It wasn’t until 1949 when AF&H actually changed its name to True Temper.

In 1950, True Temper came out with the 7ft True Temper Professional Fly Rod. This rod was made from seamless tubes of super-alloy steel, tapered by True Tempers exclusive step-down method and tungsten steel mounting screw and guides,and finished in pearlescent goosebone white. This was True Tempers most expensive rod, selling for $27.50.

By 1954, the True Temper catalog no longer contained the Professional or any other grade of steel rod. Glass had taken over. It was not that glass made fly rods of far superior action and lighter weight, but glass was proving to be far easier and cheaper to manufacture than high quality, seamless tubular steel had ever been.
 
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