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Discussion Starter #1
Couple Questions per the attached pics...

1) These are 100% Walleye, correct? As in, these are never Saugeye?

I've read through a few things online and the distinctions still aren't 100% clear to me. The "blotchiness" tells me maybe but I guess everything else tells me nope.


2) What the heck is protruding from the one's back, quite before the first dorsal fin?

I've never seen this, I googled a few different phrases to see if any info was out there but I couldn't find a thing.

I'm sure it's fine but this is harvested for our consumption (I froze this one separately though). Again I'm sure it's nothing but I also have zero qualms about discarding.
 

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1 The Kansas regs have some of the best descriptions for distinguishing between the 3 species...Walleye have few scales on their gill plate while the other 2 are rough with scaley...the 2 that start with S have Scales on their cheekplate...

Walleye
Stocked in many Kansas reservoirs, the walleye is a member of the perch family. The
walleye is thick-bodied and brown/black and yellow in color with indistinct blotches
on the sides, not extending below the lateral line. The spiny dorsal fin has indistinct
streaks or blotches with a distinct dark blotch at its rear base. The cheekplate is
smooth with few scales. April, May and early June are the best months to catch them.
Anglers troll crankbaits or drift jigs with live bait to catch these fish.

SAUGER
Sauger are common in the Missouri River, and some may be found in the Kansas River.
They have been stocked in several northeast Kansas reservoirs. The sauger is thinbodied
and brown/black and yellow in color, with distinct blotches on the sides
extending below the lateral line. The spiny dorsal fin is colorless with distinct circular black
spots throughout. Their cheekplates are rough with scales. Drifting jigs or spinner rigs tipped
with bait over main-lake points and mudflats is a popular angling technique with these fish.


SAUGEYE
The saugeye is a hybrid of a sauger and walleye and was first stocked in Kansas in
1990. Like other hybrids, the saugeye is hardy and grows fast.The saugeye is thickbodied
and brown/black and yellow in color, with distinct blotches on the sides
extending below the lateral line. The spiny dorsal has distinct streaks, often with one
or two rows of spots at the base along with a dark blotch at the rear base of the fin.
It’s cheekplate is rough with scales. Saugeye are often caught drifting flats and mainlake
points with jig-night crawler combinations and trolling crankbaits

2 - One of Slayer's front treble snagging tines off the swapped out hooks he puts on his blades...saltwater hook size 198/0!...
 

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The easiest way is to close your eyes and run your finger down their side and count the ribs. A walleye will have 29 ribs...saugeye 28 and a sauger 27...
 

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some people think they can tell the difference, most people can't. pretty sure even the dow can't otherwise I may have caught the state record saugeye. granted I only sent them a picture because I released the fish but they couldn't positively identify it by looking at it.slayer pretty much summed it up they all eat the same. actually I think saugeye are a little mushier but who knows.
 

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some people think they can tell the difference, most people can't. pretty sure even the dow can't otherwise I may have caught the state record saugeye. granted I only sent them a picture because I released the fish but they couldn't positively identify it by looking at it.slayer pretty much summed it up they all eat the same. actually I think saugeye are a little mushier but who knows.
Walleye and Sauger are easily distinguishable. Saugeye are a different story. Completely agree with you and slayer, who cares. It makes no difference to an angler.

Nice catches.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you for all the responses-

1 The Kansas regs have some of the best descriptions for distinguishing between the 3 species...Walleye have few scales on their gill plate while the other 2 are rough with scaley...the 2 that start with S have Scales on their cheekplate...

Walleye ...thick-bodied and brown/black and yellow in color with indistinct blotches on the sides, not extending below the lateral line.

SAUGEYE... thickbodied and brown/black and yellow in color, with distinct blotches on the sides extending below the lateral line.
Very helpful thank you. For a best guess quick visual identification I like the distinction of whether the blotches extend below the lateral line or not. I know the Sauger distinction is obvious but the saugeye isn't always.

The easiest way is to close your eyes and run your finger down their side and count the ribs. A walleye will have 29 ribs...saugeye 28 and a sauger 27...
Can't tell if serious... If definitive for identification that's actually awesome but don't think I'll be spending any time doing this.

Who cares? they all eat exactly the same-
I mean, I'm curious so I guess I care at least enough to simply ask a community of fisherman on a fishing forum. Seems reasonable?

2 - One of Slayer's front treble snagging tines off the swapped out hooks he puts on his blades...saltwater hook size 198/0!...
Ha, not quite... certainly sharp though.

The "protrusion" looked, felt, and acted basically exactly like a single spine in the dorsal fin webbing when moved w my finger - yet clearly not anywhere near the dorsal fin. Didn't observe anything else unusual.

This can't be a one-off thing. Has anyone seen this or anything like it? I'm not drawing from years of walleye/saugeye experience. This is literally maybe twenty total walleye I've caught since fishing for them last year. Haven't seen anything like it and was surprised by it.
 

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If you want to get all ANAL about this stuff maybe take up flailing?
 

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Looks like a genetic abnormality to me. I've seen all sorts of weird stuff like that, including fish that were missing entire fins (no, they weren't chopped off).
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Looks like a genetic abnormality to me. I've seen all sorts of weird stuff like that, including fish that were missing entire fins (no, they weren't chopped off).
That's all I can figure either - but figured I'd ask since nothing I've ever seen, read, watched, heard, or personally experienced about walleye included anything like this.

it would help to know what body of water they came from, there only 2 lakes that sauger are stocked in and a few that only have walleyes in
Pueblo Res

Haha...Yeah I was just joking.
Ha, yea was pretty sure :tongue:

Honestly my primary question was the 2nd one, about the protrusion. Because both the coloring and protrusion were obvious in that one pic just figured I'd throw both questions out there.. two birds..
 

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1 The Kansas regs have some of the best descriptions for distinguishing between the 3 species...Walleye have few scales on their gill plate while the other 2 are rough with scaley...the 2 that start with S have Scales on their cheekplate...

Walleye
Stocked in many Kansas reservoirs, the walleye is a member of the perch family. The
walleye is thick-bodied and brown/black and yellow in color with indistinct blotches
on the sides, not extending below the lateral line. The spiny dorsal fin has indistinct
streaks or blotches with a distinct dark blotch at its rear base. The cheekplate is
smooth with few scales. April, May and early June are the best months to catch them.
Anglers troll crankbaits or drift jigs with live bait to catch these fish.

SAUGER
Sauger are common in the Missouri River, and some may be found in the Kansas River.
They have been stocked in several northeast Kansas reservoirs. The sauger is thinbodied
and brown/black and yellow in color, with distinct blotches on the sides
extending below the lateral line. The spiny dorsal fin is colorless with distinct circular black
spots throughout. Their cheekplates are rough with scales. Drifting jigs or spinner rigs tipped
with bait over main-lake points and mudflats is a popular angling technique with these fish.


SAUGEYE
The saugeye is a hybrid of a sauger and walleye and was first stocked in Kansas in
1990. Like other hybrids, the saugeye is hardy and grows fast.The saugeye is thickbodied
and brown/black and yellow in color, with distinct blotches on the sides
extending below the lateral line. The spiny dorsal has distinct streaks, often with one
or two rows of spots at the base along with a dark blotch at the rear base of the fin.
It’s cheekplate is rough with scales. Saugeye are often caught drifting flats and mainlake
points with jig-night crawler combinations and trolling crankbaits

2 - One of Slayer's front treble snagging tines off the swapped out hooks he puts on his blades...saltwater hook size 198/0!...

this feburary was an anomaly for me because at 2 buttes, they stocked all 3 species of bugeyes. i know this because I caught all 3 of them that morning off dropshots. koldkut will back me up on this, he was there with me. cool looking fish that, as slayer said... ate exactly the same.
 

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The easiest way is to close your eyes and run your finger down their side and count the ribs. A walleye will have 29 ribs...saugeye 28 and a sauger 27...
sounds easy :biggrin1::biggrin1::biggrin1::biggrin1:
 
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