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Discussion Starter #1
Does anybody have any links to reliable information on these issues for Colorado walleyes?

Thanks.
 

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Thanks, Tony. That is very helpful.

It doesn't adress life span at all, though. Does anyone have any more info on these subjects?
 

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You bet bud! At the bottom of the article it brings up the facts of bringing an eye up from deep depths and sounds like the Laker Saver could really help with this matter as well!
 

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Contact this guy, he's pretty good at returning emails. It's directed towards NB waters but he's still talking about walleyes. He's way ahead of the game as far as walleyes go. If I can find a few of my PM's, I'll post them here just for you, Don.


"Nebraska Game and Parks Commission Simply put, there is no biological reason to close the season during the walleye spawn. Each female walleye is capable of producing hundreds of thousands of eggs. The walleye population in every Nebraska reservoir will deposit literally b...illions of eggs during the spawn. Even with the harvest of a few female walleyes during the spawn period, there are more than enough walleye eggs spawned. If even a small fraction of all of those walleye eggs survive to adulthood there will be more than enough walleyes to maintain that population. There is no biological need to protect every adult walleye.

I have always put it this way--if we need to protect female walleyes, then we need to protect them when most of them are harvested. There are far more walleyes caught and harvested, big females included, from Nebraska waters during the months of May and June than are harvested during the spawn period. We could protect more female walleyes by closing the season during Memorial Day weekend!!!!! Anyone go for that?

What difference does it make when that female walleye is harvested? If she is removed from the population in June or October, the result is the same as removing her in early April.

The walleye population in Branched Oak has been negatively impacted by the invasion of white perch. We have had relatively poor walleye recruitment in Branched Oak ever since the white perch have become established. Small walleyes are out-competed or eaten by white perch. We have the daily bag limit of no more than one walleye larger than 22 inches at Branched Oak because we need every one of those predatory walleyes in there to eat white perch. It has nothing to do with protecting those walleyes from fishing during the spawn period. I argued that we should have a total catch & release regulation for Branched Oak walleyes, like we do for B. Oak wipers and flatheads, but you know walleyes are good to eat, so we settled on the 1 fish > 22 inch bag limit.

Early spring is the most popular time of year for folks to go fishing. Some of those folks like to fish for walleyes at that time and some of them believe that is the time of year when they have the best chance to catch some walleyes. Our position is one where we want people to GO FISH! If they are not harming the population, and fishing during the walleye spawn does NOT harm our walleye populations, then why would not we want people fishing? "

Daryl Bauer
Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
[email protected]
http://barbsandbacklashes.wordpress.com/See More
March 29, 2010 at 10:28am
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, Cher, but it doesn't address growth rates or life span. That's the info I'm looking for.
 

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gofindyourowndamnfish said:
Thanks, Cher, but it doesn't address growth rates or life span. That's the info I'm looking for.
Don, just email Daryl or get on his Face Book, I'm sure he has something for you. He's a wealth of info.


Just don't preach to me about walleyes after you find out ;D Uno I got love for you ;)
 

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Lew said:
I found this.
http://www.ifishillinois.org/gofish/tips/Walleye_and_Sauger.pdf

Found another article saying the colder weather up north makes the walleyes life span from 12-15 years while the warmer south region keeps the life span around 7-10 years so I would assume we would be in the middle maybe?
That makes alot of sense!

There is also a southern river strain that used to be very common to the Mississippi drainage. Infact the big fish from Greers Ferry are suppose to be remnants of that strain? The 22 lber from Greers is now excepted as the true world record.

It can take a walleye 5-6 years to reach just 15 inchs at Seminoe and only three years to hit 18-20" at Glendo. And that is the same river system. Just goes to show how important forage is!! Shad especially!!
 
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