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Discussion Starter #1
Hey gurus,

If I wanted to tie up a Lindy Rig instead of a bottom bouncer for Boyd or Carter Lakes, how much weight would you recommend? I am mostly using bottom bouncers that weigh 1 3/4 Oz. I was thinking of using a Lindy rig with a plastic worm on a #4 Slow Death hook, similar to what I use on the bottom bouncer. Last year I was trolling at about 2 MPH, but now that I have the kicker on the boat I can go much slower. We are just learning. . . and could use a little help.
 

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Use enough weight to maintain contact w/the bottom with your line at a 45 degree angle. The amt. of weight increases with speed and current. At 0.5 mph, 3/4 - 1 oz. works well. A 2.0 mph... you'll have to experiment .
 

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The general rule of thumb is an ounce for every ten feet of depth (again just a general rule - I like to use 1 ounce weights down to 20 fow and 2oz at 30fow)

10fow - 1oz
20fow - 2oz
30fow - 3oz
 

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Lindy rigging is awesome been doing it for years with almost as much success as those throwing blade baits. I try to keep my speed between .05 and 1mph using three quarts for up to twenty five feet and one to one and a quarter for deeper. ghost man said it best just make sure you keep in contact with the bottom. you can use both worms or minnows but I rarely use a slow death hook with this presentation usually just use a red hook. also pull your rod back and forth a lot of times fish will follow it and strike when it looks like its getting away.
 

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Lead weights with holes can be crimped onto a piece of mono or wire to adjust as needed. If your lucky they will slide off if you get hung up on the bottom. Then its simple to add more. I use to use my cast bullet rejects as weights and drill holes in them.
 

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Adjusting wieghts, changing speeds, crimping, siounds like waaay too much work-
 

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Some good advice. A few more thoughts. You can use your large outboard rather than the kicker if you deploy a drift sock. Easy to use and great for speed control. Also if you decide to drift fish...a sock can be your best friend in the wind.

Trolling with the wind allows for better boat control and lure presentation. Oftentimes it's better to troll with the wind and then fire up the gas motor, head back to where you started, and repeat rather than trolling back to where you started against the wind. It's well worth reeling in and motoring back, before starting your track again.

In clear water..troll into the sun. Walleye will position themselves with their tails to the sun and see your presentation coming towards them rather than it coming up from behind.

This time of the year when the water is still cold but surface temps warm throughout the day. If trolling, start out fishing the bottom in the morning and work your way up the water column as the day heats up. Walleye will move up and suspend in the warmer surface water. Especially if there is some chop diffusing the light.

Don't troll a straight line until you have your speed dialed in. Watch and remember which rods get bit. If it's the inside rod on an s turn...you might want to slow down..outside rod conversely speed up. If you can dial in the speed they want, you can then troll both rods in a straight line. And if possible, always run one rod just behind your prop wash on a short line. Fish love the prop wash.

Biggest mistake I see with trollers is catching a fish and then continuing on their merry way. Walleyes run in schools. Where there is one...there are always more. Either stop and jig for those fish ...or learn to troll in a tight circle. Very easy to do with a bottom bouncer or a jig. Just use fewer rods and stay on top of the fish.

Finally...if using crawlers on a harness...make sure they run straight and true.
 

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x2! Also, you can back troll using your big motor or kicker to lower your speed. Add a sock off the bow to go even slower. Back trolling allows for superior boat control when following weed lines or depth contours.
 

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Agree. The ability to change up and try different things can be the difference between a good day and a bad day on the lake. I love a good jig or blade bite. However, I've also picked up a lot of fish over the years strolling. Night time trolling is also very effective.

When the shad become thick in the summer. Bigger walleyes suspend and follow the shad. You can find walleyes at six to ten feet deep over fifty foot of water.

It's also a good locating tool. You can cover a lot of water. Find the fish and then stop and fish. It's also a good way to get kids and beginners on a bite. Let's them have fun while they pick up the nuances of fishing.

And no one can say it isn't effective. Most walleye tournaments are won by trollers using lures or spinners.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Beginner's Luck

Trollers- SMH-
We were out one day with Dan Swanson in our boat on Boyd Lake last summer. MY DW Sharon was sitting in the passenger seat, and of course has a fishing license, but doesn't like to fish much. I call her my "extra rod stamp". We stopped in one spot for a few minutes, talking and Dan rigged up a metal vertical jig. He handed it to Sharon and told her to let it hit the bottom, then reel it back up about six inches and twitch it. . .

Literally, as soon as she did that, Bam, about an 18" Rainbow hit that jig and would not let go! So now, in addition to calling her my extra rod stamp, I have to call her my "good luck charm"
 

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Here's my best suggestion. Learn to read and trust your electronics when walleye fishing. Even cheap fish finders will let you see the fish. If you don't see any fish ...keep looking until you do. No sense fishing where the fish aren't.
 

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Absolutely! My best suggestion... get over the slimers and go after walleye, crappie, perch or cats. If you can't learn to live without 'em (slimers), fish them in rivers, streams or cold water reservoirs... much better for table fare!
 
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