Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was just employeed in my first fly shop. I want to know what imparticular you guys like and don't like when you go into a fly shop. I have a pretty good idea of what I do and don't like but I want to see if theres anything I haven't thought of that seems to be a general consensus. More informations the better...thanks guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
Personally I love to tie flies and appreciate when a shop has a lot of different materials to pick from.  I'm very lucky that I have a local fly shop that is just around the corner from  that has more tying supplies then I could ever imagine.  In years past I would frequent some shops that would never seem to carry a lot of things and if they did they had a limited selection.  I do realize that shops don't make a lot of money off of materials, but I don't make it a habit of buying $500 rods every month.

Another thing that I really enjoy about the shop I frequent are the fly tying demos given every Saturday.  The demos are free and it's amazing how many "little things" you learn from other people.

If possible it's always great when there is a large selection of rods and reels to choose from.  I know some shops are limited to particular brands, but the more variety available the better.  For example I want to see first hand the difference between a Galvan reel and a Ross reel. 

Hope that helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,887 Posts
My thoughts are- If you don't have what a guy (or gal) need then help them find it or point them in the right direction, even if it means sending them to another store. Flat "no"s just discourage people. A little unsolicited advice every now and then is nice, you seem to have a great grasp on flytying as well as flyfishing. A cooler of beer right inside the door is always nice...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,678 Posts
Ive spent some time working in a flyshop...and the number one thing you can do is provide good customer service--- no matter what type of fishing the person does or regardless if that person is buying anything that particular day or not.  be open, friendly, go out of your way to provide information and tips, and dont rule anyone out as a future customer.  also take time to conduct friendly conversation, a lot of people just stop by to chat and see how things are going and dont want to spend money that day.  dont be snotty or rude, and lose the "holier than thou" attitude a lot of fly shop employees seem to wear when they are at work or on the river.  the guy that spin fishes today might take up a fly rod tomorrow, so dont critisize him or her for the way they fish or the gear he or she uses.  if a person has a question, offer good advice or at least the guidance to find out the answers to the info they are inquiring about.  dont lie, if you dont know something tell them that.  cast all the rods so you can tell people how they perform, and study up on your knowledge of the local streams and equipment you have to offer.  give your customers options, dont make them feel like they have to buy today or must purchase the items you are selling.  above all, be FRIENDLY and offer your knowledge freely...people always have other places to spend thier money, give them a reason to come back to your shop.  take care of them, and in turn they will take care of you.  whew, thats a mouth full, ill shut up now   ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I like lots of "stuff". I don't buy a new rod every month or so, but I do buy lots of "stuff" - fly tying things, gadgets, special flys, tippet, etc. I also like friendly sales guys because everyone likes to talk about the big one that got away, how many they caught last week, and learn where a good spot is and what the trout are hitting. Haven't been to a fly tying demo, but I may do that some day. Sponsering inexpensive trips to special places would be nice. I'm always amazed when I learn of week trips to Alaska for only $8000 plus air.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Well I have gone back and forth when it comes to fly shops vs sportsman vs buying online. Yesterday I actually went to a new fly shop. Charlies Fly shop in Arvada now I learned of this place via an article in flyfisherman a few months ago talking about a jujubee midge he created. Now my reasoning is if someone is willing to share with the world a secret it is only fair I give the guy some business for that information. Rare I'm sure but I think it's only right. Now Charlie is in there making a sandwich but takes time to get me everything I need. Now he could of just rung me out and finished his sandwich but he took a few minutes explained everything about the fly and showed me his website which has step by step instructions on how to tie the fly i was looking to tie. Now after reading a couple other threads in this forum obviously there has always been this fued between flyfishers and the rest of the anglers. Even in the flyfishingworld there are divisions. I've never met a guide on the river that was friendly unless I was paying them. Most guys decked out in Orvis gear never share information. I have only received one fly on a river from a fellow fisherman yet I've giving out dozens. So my best advice is treat everyone that walks in your shop the same. It shouldnt matter if he drops a grand on a new outfit or 12 bucks on a couple leaders. I was in a shop years ago and the owner was on the phone talking to a buddy and he said i could careless about the flytiers its the guys buying rods I'm interested in. I was there buying hooks I haven't been back.
Good Luck on the new job....



Fish
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
691 Posts
Rottal's reply is dead on. One time I was asking a fly shop employee how to tie an egg fly. He showed me right on the spot and gave it to me! It was a nice touch. It also made me a loyal customer. John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Great stuff that I will definetly keep in mind. The shop I'm in isn't a really high end shop, it's the white river fly shop that operates out of bass pro shop here in nashville. Even then, I think it will be a great stepping stone for things to come in the next few years. They don't get a hole lot of costumer volume in this neck of the woods, but this will allow me plenty of time to sit and tie, read up on things, watch casting videos and everything else I love (while be paid for it). I couldn't think of a better way to spend my afternoons. They have an upcoming event called the fishing classic. Through this event they want me to teach a tying class featuring western patterns that are less comon out east. I am going to start with the basic thread midges, then progress to some other useful patterns we have all grown to love: RS2's, bar's emergers, wd-40's, rainbow warriors, hothead leeches (north platte style) and my new favorite mentioned earlier..the jujabee midge. If anyone else has any other suggestions as to some patterns I haven't mentioned that we use out west let me know. I tell you, the fish out here are so easy. They are mostly stockers and will hit about anything. However, the few lunkers that exist are more into what is constantly present and not always a generic prince nympth and a wolly bugger. For me, employing the western tactics that we have to live by in order to catch fish has helped me emensely on these waters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
691 Posts
TopSlugger, Gauging from the tone of the way you write posts you seem to be a fairly affable fellow. I don't think you'll have any trouble doing a great job. John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
The qualities of a good fly shop are: Honesty, integrity, passion, and sincerity.

Honesty is not simply telling the truth. It's admiting when you don't know something or when you don't carry the best product for the task at hand. It's saying things like "I don't know, let me look that up for you".

Integrity: Standing by your word. This is easy to do when you're honest.

Passion: You really love what you're doing, and the passion is infectious to your customers. Your passion makes you go above and beyond the call of duty to help a customer.

Sincerity: Customers know when you're pushing "old stock" or when you're giving a stock answer to something. This makes them less likely to return the next time.


Well, just my two cents...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
John Thanks for you?re comments. I truly do seek to get as far in fly fishing as I can these next few years and hopefully write a book someday. Even then, I still want to maintain an image of approachability which I have experienced through the Orvis Company Store in Englewood. I know that right now people have mixed feelings towards Orvis and what they have begun to stand for in the fly fishing industry. However, in my experience with Orvis, I have experienced only the best costumer service and everything you guys have mentioned. Their store manager Tucker Bamford has been my fly fishing mentor in many regards. He is passionate about fly fishing, but still spends his winters drilling holes in the hard tops ice fishing or trolling for walleye in the summer. His store and the way it operates is a direct reflection of him in which I hope to emulate in my new venture through the fly fishing industry both in the retail and guide end of the sport. When you go into the Orvis shop, you feel like everyone is there for you, and truly they are. I have had instances when I?ve had a fighting butt fall of a 9wt or a counterbalance fall of a reel (and don?t think this has to do with quality of product, it?s 100 percent misuse on my part lol). Even then, I have never left the shop with out having what I needed replaced right then and there. They know I will be out on the water soon and can?t afford to have my equipment sent to the warehouse for repair. And this was all before I became a loyal costumer and someone the guys fish with, though it certainly made me want to become both. I know Orvis often times gets a bad wrap by the people who carry and use their products, but don?t thing this is universal. If anyone is living in the south Denver area and looking for a great fly shop and a partnership of commitment, I would strongly suggest utilizing there shop and the knowledge they have to offer. Thanks again for everyone?s help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I look for a friendly place where everyone is treated equally. I've been in a couple of places where I was being helped but when an obviously regular customer came in I was completely abandoned. I can understand treating your regulars a little special, but not at the expense of the other customers.

I also look for NON fly-fishing-snobs at the counter. Just friendly folks who'll answer questions, give advice, or just chat without the "you'll never fish at my level" attitude.

That's related to also liking shops that realize that everyone was a beginner at some point. I've seen a worker rattle off a long list of flies and point to the display case, as if the beginner/customer would be able to find them, much less remember them. I like places that will help a beginner out - walk the guy over to the fly case and ask if he needs help finding them. Heck, pick 'em out and tell him what each one is and how it's fished as you do it! Or even steering them away from all shiney new doo-dads they COULD sell, but know aren't really necessary. And, while some of us are beginners at fly fishing, we've spent just as much time on the water as anyone else, just with different gear. Since we've fished before, we'll know when they are trying to sell us crap. And we'll remember it.

I like a good range of equipment. I don't like the shops that only carry the top-shelf stuff. There is plenty of relatively low priced, quality, equipment in the marketplace and I wish more shops would carry more of it. Not the cheap junk that's out there, but good gear at modest prices.

I don't like it when the employees feel the need to try to sell me everything I glance at. "I don't need new waders! I'm just standing by them!"

Finally, a big, lazy, shop-dog is always nice.

Long winded post - I'm done now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,656 Posts
First off congrats topslugger. Your living the dream baby.

I agree with the advice from everyone else. I just want to say make sure you are friendly, friendly, friendly. There is nothing more intimidating to a rookie fly fisherman than a fly shop. Welcome them genuinley and make them feel comfortable. This was not the case when I started and other shops got my bussiness. Also if your gonna use names of flys point them out in the case. I have been flyfishing for a long time and still don't know alot of stuff looks like. I hate it when shop guides stay behind the counter and say yeah the green bellied gold chained hare's ear is killing them and they don't point it out to me. Just be helpfull and have fun.

I'll help you "demo" some 9wts for pike this summer when you get back. ;D ;D
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top