Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was just curious. I could imagine, if there are any, there are some HUGE fish. And if any of you have ever fished it, what you cought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,755 Posts
Talk to TAL0362, she is the expert around here on great lakes fishing.

I have fished Lake Erie for bass and walleyes and done well, but my only experience with the larger lakes is getting drunk and falling into Lake Michigan. In January.
 
T

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
i have fished them all, with superior being the one i fished least and erie the most, since i am from ohio.
the largest fish known swimming in any of the great lakes would be a sturgeon, followed by a carp. it is all fresh water. the notable game fish, such as lake trout, salmon, brown trout, steelhead, walleye bass (small and large mouth), perch are the prime targets. some junk fish like drum (sheephead), pike and small panfish such as crappie, sunfish, white perch, white bass. the great lakes are very diverse with species.
i can't accurately say how big the sturgeon get, but they would be considerable and carp in in the upper double digits.
the game fish usually are big compared to the same fish in smaller lakes, and most lakes are smaller - e.g. great lakes they call them.
i have taken several 8lb smallies, 13+ lb walleye, 2lb yellow perch and hefty white bass, pike and sheephead.
i have caught some monster lake trout and browns, and very heavy steelhead. i have seen huge salmon come out.
the great lakes is big open water and requires captains skills and respect and a big boat. i have fished in big and small boats in all of them. fishing the great lakes is a whole ballgame in itself and one that can be very productive for the species they offer. best is to use a charter service or go with someone local to one of the lakes. of 5 lakes they are all different, fish different and behave different.
hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,813 Posts
Craig,

I like fishing in da UP eh, da big pond,
Superior,, ehh.

Its a big lake with a lot of inland water, and not to many fisherman. Its cold water so the trout and salmon are smaller than the warmer shallower lakes like Michigan, Huron, Erie and Ontario. I think its better fishing than some of the places I have fished in Canada, and a way cheaper vacation.

Each year we take a 16 day vacation (minus 4 days travel towing the boat) up there. My mom has a house on warm fish water, that is 1 mile in the boat from cold water fish. The big fish on an average vacation will include 3-5 lb smallmouth, 3-7 lb walleye(last year was not good), 5-10 lb Pike, 10-20 lb Lakers, Coho, occasional King, Steelhead, and lake run Brown's. Plus there are inumerable perch, rock bass... If we decide to fish for brookies, 8-12 inchers are common in the inland streams and beaverponds. Like everywhere, you gota know where to go and what to use.

And then there are the Berries, early July to mid July is Strawberry season, mid july till the first week of August is Raspberrys, and early to mid August is Blue berry season. Yum.

Its heaven,,,
Did I mention skeeters, black flys, deer(dear) flys, horse flys, and noseeums?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
The only native trout in the Great Lakes are Lake trout and Brook trout. There is a population of what are known as "coaster" brook trout in Lake Superior, that grow to large sizes, live in the lake and migrate up streams to spawn. Without going into too much history, lots of nonnative fish have been unintentionally introduced, and many nonnative salmon and trout (mostly Pacific species) were introduced and have really caught on. Some of the best stream fishing for migrating steelhead in the country can now be found in the rivers flowing into Lake Michigan. Because the Great Lakes States still stock them heavily, this is likely to be the case for the foreseeable future.

Lake Erie is is the shallowest of the great lakes, and there are some huge walleye, and smallmouth bass there. There are also pike in the great lakes. I watched a guy catch a nice one while flyfishing with streamers for Coaster brook trout at the mouth of the Black River (upper Peninsula, Michigan).

Other than the Pacific Salmon and trout, and brown Trout, most of the other game fish found there are native, and some of them are facing potential future declines due to recent introductions of certain nonnative fish that are egg predators. Hopefully, the effects will not be severe, but you can never tell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
Walking Eagle said:
but my only experience with the larger lakes is getting drunk and falling into Lake Michigan. In January.
ohhhh nooo lol what were ya drinkin???lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,755 Posts
pitbull said:
Walking Eagle said:
but my only experience with the larger lakes is getting drunk and falling into Lake Michigan. In January.
ohhhh nooo lol what were ya drinkin???lol
I don't remember, I was a teenager at the time. I don't drink any more.
.....
.....
.....
.....
I don't drink any less, either......
 
T

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
i think those Q%W#^ bucket biologists have been illegally stocking the great lakes!!!!!!!!!!!
actually, most are introduced through balast water of incoming ships from other parts of the world. like the goby, zebra mussle (obviously not a fish), white perch....yadda yadda yadda.
anyone ever hear of the "blue pike"? my older (well fossils actually) family members used to fish for them in lake erie, but are all gone now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
i grew up on Saginaw Bay in Bay City MI. Trolling for walleye always fun in the summer. Most dont shore fish lake huron as the water is nasty, but there are many river inlets that are fun, namely the Kawkawlin river.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
tekneek said:
i think those Q%W#^ bucket biologists have been illegally stocking the great lakes!!!!!!!!!!!
actually, most are introduced through balast water of incoming ships from other parts of the world.  like the goby, zebra mussle (obviously not a fish), white perch....yadda yadda yadda.
anyone ever hear of the "blue pike"?  my older (well fossils actually) family members used to fish for them in lake erie, but are all gone now. 
Yeah, blue pike were actually related to the walleye, but since there aren't any in scientific collections, there has been no way to verify they are a separate species or subspecies. There are organizations that are offering rewards for anyone who turns in an actual, verifiable blue pike.

The nastiest of the invading fish in the Great Lakes are believed to have come from balast water. Some may have come from pet release, too. Most of the bait bucket fish dumped into the lakes haven't turned out to be big problems, that we know of. The Great Lakes are a great hodge-podge of fish from all over the place, today.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top