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Fellas!

Well the temp picks up a bit this week but fall temperature could be upon us as early as next week. So it's time to dust off my Magellan Mag2 wader for fall. I also have Cabelas neoprene 5mm wader for Winter.

So I'm just curious what kind of waders do y'all use?

Thanks
Alex
 

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So I'm just curious what kind of waders do y'all use?
LMFAO-You'll will undoubtedly get a variety of answers to such a broad question. So, here is the generic response: WARM and WATERPROOF. Brand unimportant!

I personally stopped using neoprene years ago as they tended to make me sweat too much and the seams eventually start to leak at the most inopportune times. Nothing worse than sweating on a cold day or having a cold wet spot to deal with.

For me, my toes and fingers are the most critical things to protect. I always carry hand warmers in my hoodies and or wader pockets. Never have found a quality glove that I can cast with and still have the ability to feel the line so I don't general keep gloves on while fishing. They are used to walk from spot to spot. I'll use a thin liner if I have to (but very seldom). I use a thin sock under a good quality wickable material sock (again to minimize sweating) and at times I will use some baby powder in the socks to help that as well. I like to be able to wiggle my toes inside my wader shoes so again proper layering and fit/comfort/weight of the shoe is more important to me than brand name. I have found a few different brands over the years that I liked only to have them discontinued so I tend to buy at least two pairs once I find a style that works for me.

If I am not going to wade I will just wear my ice fishing coveralls with just a pair of long johns with a light pair of loose pants to allow for air circulation.

No matter what I am doing I always wear a moisture wicking long sleeve shirt under a hoodie or two. NO JACKETS for me (way to bulky). I don't usually wear beanies either. I prefer just to pull my hood up if the wind gets any bite to it.

LAYERS are the key to staying comfortable. Being unable to move under a pile of clothes and sweating is the same as underdressing.

I can say from my experience that cheaper waders will do the job, but they won't last near as long as a quality pair. Especially, if you are like most of us that don't look before we sit or lean against something.

Welcome Aboard!
 

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I'm with Ninja... I've fly fished in the most horrid of conditions in breathables along with good layers. I can stay a lot warmer with good layers, while keeping my circulation good. I would not buy super cheap waders, but if budget is a serious concern, try Reddington or Patagonias on Sierra Trading Post.
 

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I think we all concur that using breathables with good layering underneath is the way to go.....year round. I have an old pair of neopremes that I rarely use. While I was up at Steamboat lake in late October I used them for one day. The next day I used my breathables and found them just as warm and a bit more comfortable. Able to add and remove layers made for a pleasant day in my float tube.

If I were bank fishing then I would definitely go with breathables if you are to be hiking around. Neopremes would eventually become too hot if you are moving around quite a bit and would make for a miserable day. Breathables, again, allow you to remove or add layers which would make hiking around more enjoyable.
 

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I'm coming into this thread as an amateur shoreliner but thought I'd kick in. I've been using Redhead PVC hip waders since early fall. First thing I did was by a decent pair of insoles for comfort when I walked and stood in the water. As the weather got colder I bought a pair of Redhead knee high wader socks. Last month or so I bought an additional pair of knee high socks at SW that have a sewn in area on the toes you can slide a foot warmer packet into. I wear the two pairs of socks. As far as pants I wear thin thermals and my quick dry fishing pants. So far I like the setup. Gets me out beyond the sheet ice (within reason) and I've been pretty comfortable overall. Probably a good idea at my age that I don't go out any further than hip waders allow anyway :). I can move around easily and and it doesn't interfere with my top gear. Fairly easy to put on and take off. One drawback with hip waders is I have to always be aware of the fact that you can't go in deeper than the top of your waders and be aware of wind waves. Can't believe we're talking about shoreline fishing at all this time of year...I feel for you folks waiting to drag your rigs out onto the ice but looks like it's starting to happen some places. Be careful out there.
 

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Toe heater pax

Have found that these things work better when I put them on top of my toes rather than under my toes? Or maybe that is what the instruction say to do? (Instructions only when all else fails).

1 - Under is the fleshy part of the foot, on top is where the blood flow and functioning structures are? Better to keep those functions warm rather than the fleshy structures under the foot?

2 - hated feeling like I was always stepping on something

3 - open them a few minutes before you put them on to allow them to get started doing their thing. Not too early tho as they will inflate like a balloon and then you can't put them on.


Gortex/similar over layers of appropriate material underneath, topped by a wind resistant shell of some sort works best for me. Get a neck gator too.
 

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Breathable waders with layers underneath are the only way to go, I don't even wear neoprenes for duck hunting anymore. Also, don't wear multiple pairs of socks and crush your feet into the wader boots in the wintertime, having a little space for air is what will keep your feet warm and dry. Get one good pair of socks and wear those.
 
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