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I snagged a large trout infested with whirling disease today. it had white spots all over. I took it out of the river system.
Are you supposed to remove fish with whirling disease, so they can't infect other fish? what about during spawning season, can an infected fish still reproduce to yield healthy browns?
 
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If the fish you "removed" from the river system was a brown, and a large one, I am willing to bet it didn't have whirling disease. Skeletal deformities are the best way to identify WD. Large trout are not nearly as succeptable to WD as fingerlings.Once thier skeletal structure has turned entirely to bone the risk drops greatly. Darkness(in some cases almost black) of skin in tail and head are also good indicators. Secondly, browns are VERY VERY resistant to WD. Hence the overtaking of rainbows in our states watersheds. I have seen many browns happy and feeding in rivers that I have seen sickly,kink-tailed, very dark bows, chasing thier tails. There are probably 100 different things(fungus,virul, I don't know what else) that brown had growing on it but I bet it wasn't WD.
Hope that helps
 

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Thanks. I read a similar report on the danblanton site. Should fungus infected fish be removed from the river? Do they pose a risk to other fish? will they reproduce healthy trout?
 

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I can't remember the type of fungus yours had name, but I have read about it and it is NATURAL and does not harm the fish. It occurs primarily on browns (sometimes in bows) during the october and winter months. I remember 5 years ago the spawning browns in canyon creek (many up to 15 pounds) were infested with it. They were okay though. It happens I think primarily because the fish are stressed and their physiology is so focused on spawning it can't ward off normal fungi in the water.
I caught a 14" rainbow with whirling disease (A very crooked spine) 2 weeks ago in the colorado river near glenwood in one of my favorite holes. Not sure what to do with it, I euthanized it to be sure. Who knows what you should do with fish infested with WD? I don't.
My bro iceintheveins also scooped up an 18" rainbow trout that was maybe 1 pound at best that same day. It had something wierd going on with it; looked like it probably had metabolic acidosis and was recovering from it. Flyfisherman probably fought it far too long when it was a 3 pounder a month or so ago and it probably nearly died.

Who knows what you should do with fish infested with WD?
 
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I believe that taking the fish out of the water is a good idea. From how I understand it, WD is spread through the relase of spores after an infected fish dies. So chucking it up on shore and giving it back to the ecosystem is probably the best bet. Not entirely sure though, would like to hear a more educated response. I just don't know enough about transmission and contraction of WD to tell ya for sure.
 

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It's just a simple fungus as bear notes. Not Whirling Disease. Fush ususally get this fungus when water temps are high, or during the spawn. This happens because their slime coat is removed, that typically prevents the fungus.

Just a word of warning, remember it is against the law to throw a trout or other gamefish up on the bank, no matter how well intentioned. Just release the fish back into the water and let nature take care of itself.
 

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ClackaRam said:
It's just a simple fungus as bear notes. Not Whirling Disease. Fush ususally get this fungus when water temps are high, or during the spawn. This happens because their slime coat is removed, that typically prevents the fungus.

Just a word of warning, remember it is against the law to throw a trout or other gamefish up on the bank, no matter how well intentioned. Just release the fish back into the water and let nature take care of itself.
right w/ everything clackaram. Or how about harvest the fish if legal and eat it? I know people can eat fish with WD and it won't harm them.
 

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the most important and main thing to be careful of with WD infected fish is to not transfer them to another water way. once a water way is infected there is now way to clean it up with out removing all the trout and waiting for the spores to degrade but that could take many years if it is even possible.

browns are relitively relitively uneffected by WD although the can be infected and then pass it onto other trout with devistating effects( thats how WD made its daybue), from what ive read every brown in a WD infected stream has it. in the browns native land they have had WD for a long time and have built up an immunity the fish that survived it spawnned fish that could tollerat it better and it just kept going till we gotr the browns of today that thrive in the WD inffected water ways

so if you catch a WD infected rainbow even if it looks nasty it has still survived and might breed and just maybe down the road rainbows will develope the same resistance to WD as the browns so i would let them go you wont be hurting the fishing and you just might be releasing the begining of a new generation of trout
 

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It was just a common fungus. Oh and Clacka, try telling the CDOW that throwing fish up on the bank to kill them is illegal. They do it all the time.
 

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The DOW provides take permits that may allow some of their biologists, and others, to kill fish for reasons other than eating (scientific experiments, special management action, etc.).

Fish get fungus only when stressed by other factors, such as temperature (like someone else already noted). Spawning is also stressful for fish, so some get fungus around spawning time. Should not be harmful to release the fish.
 
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