Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,266 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Im not very good at judging wind speeds and wanted to know how much wind is to much? For example:If it says 20mph winds is that to much to have the boat out?



[me=Jay_In_Parker] [/me]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,651 Posts
That's like asking if -20 below is too cold for ice-fishing. Everybody will have their personal comfort level. It depends how bad you want to fish out of the boat!
 
D

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
SLAYERFISH said:
That's like asking if -20 below is too cold for ice-fishing. Everybody will have their personal comfort level. It depends how bad you want to fish out of the boat!
And sometimes the wind and waves crashing into the shore will really turn on the fish. So at that point it's a question of whether you can safely control your boat near the rocks while you cash in on the bonanza!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
833 Posts
It also depends of where you fish. At Cedar Bluff a 10-20 mph wind is good considering what it's capable of doing.
I agree too that fish turn on especially in at the wind blown points and coves. It's a pain in the rear to hold the boat but it's worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,878 Posts
It also depends alot on the way you fish-you can troll in 20 MPH with no problem but if you want to fish a senko or tube-forget it. I like to vertical jig in the winter-anything over 10-15 and thats almost impossible unless you anchor. As the wind gets higher I start going more and more to the hard baits like cranks and spinnerbaits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,128 Posts
One reason I am upgrading trolling motor this year. By the way a 15 to 20 mile an hour wind in Kansas is called a breeze.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,813 Posts
In my opinion, it depends on the boat, the body of water, and the experience of the capitan, how miserable you or your crew want to be, and whether or not you are having fun. It's not so much about wind speed (you can always anchor or troll - down wind if need be) as wave height and wave structure, which is a function of wind speed, fetch, water depth, current and other things.

I think its fun to troll on lake superior when there are 6-8 foot high - long wave length rollers with not much wind, and no fun at all to fish in 3-5 foot waves breaking on the bow in a 30 mile per hour wind.

And its kind of funny, the only way to get experience in wind and waves, is to go try it in nasty weather and see what you are comfortable with.
 
M

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
TAL0362 said:
I think its fun to troll on lake superior when there are 6-8 foot high - long wave length rollers with not much wind
When I was a kid, my Mom and Step dad had a 24 foot Wellscraft and my Dad had a 12 foot Valco aluminum boat that we used out in the ocean. My Dad took the Coast Guard Auxiliary Boater's Safety course and taught (most of) those things on to me. I can remember being in that 12 foot boat in 6-8 foot seas catching sand bass like crazy off San Pedro and feeling safe about it. I can also remember swamping the 24 foot Wellscraft on the wake of a cargo ship because my Mom and Step dad didn't realize how easy it was, or what to do, when you start "surfing" on the boat.

There was also a lake near Bakersfield called Lake Isabella. The lake had a warning light system because of the wind - light hit yellow and you get off the lake. Light hits red and you head for shore immediately. My Dad always got us home dry because he new how to handle it and new when to say when.
 
F

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
In the cold water around here, anything over a light breeze COULD be life threatening. If you will remember that and act accordingly, you can handle some pretty serious weather. Don't ever overload a boat- a friend left on the bank will still be alive to be mad at you. Maintain and know your equipment- an outboard that stalls or a bilge pump that's weak can kill you. Life jackets, paddles and anchor ropes that are buried and tangled are worthless. More than you wanted I know. Just saw some folks on Spinney the other day that were pushing it to the limit and it still makes me mad. I had to leave because my son and I didn't want to witness a drowning and it sure looked possible. I agree with the other comments- it's not the wind speed as much as it is how the lake is responding to it or how you approach the conditions.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top