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Discussion Starter #1
I ran into this "system" last night that uses wool as the floating indicator material: http://www.strikeindicator.com/Default.asp

I'm thinking it would be pretty easy to make something like this for less than the cost of the "combo pack" ($33). However it's not clear to me how yarn indicators stack up against wool (I've used the former, but not the later)...


Has anyone tried wool indicators before and if so can you please comment on their functionality?

Thnx
 

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I've used them, but to use the tubing that comes with the pack, you have to use just a bit of yarn, and it is hard to get just that bit to float. Not my bag. I'm really interested in trying the Joe Shafer kind of indicator rig.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
yarn...wool ?? who cares. use thing a ma bobbers for fishing.
I hear you... but I think materials like yarn/wool can be used when a more subtle delivery is required. I tend to carry a few different options with me and will resort to a bobber when fishing heavier with not-so-spooky fish.
 

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The yarn/wool doesn't help that much with a subtle delivery. It's to help detect subtle takes. They only problem with this set-up it is that the yarn/wool will get water logged. I'd recommend conditioning your yarn/wool before you get to the river.
 

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I use the new zealand wool indicator in slower moving water where little or no dropshot weight is needed. In these conditions, it definitely lands softer in my opinion and seems to not spook fish as much. I also like the fact that it can slide up and down the leader without kinking the line. If you're going to experiment with it, I recommend treating a clump of the yarn material with Watershed treatment to have on hand. It'll float longer without having to apply floatant as much throughout the day.
 

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After watching some underwater video at a Charlie Mayer presentation of clear and white thingybobbers I switched to clear. But when a light presentation is needed I do have a few yarn indicators.
 

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I don't understand about the suspended fish part - thought you were supposed to put as much weight on as you could to get to the bottom and not get snagged. Aren't the fish on the bottom eating? Or was he just talking about fishing to a particular fish that was eating?
 

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The New Zealand indicators work great, it's all I use anymore, i put Gink on it once before it gets wet and it floats great all day. They also cast better than thingamabobbers and adjust easier. Only drawback is if you have a bunch of weight on, but usually if I have enough weight to sink the indicator I'm doing more of a high-stick technique anyway so it doesn't matter too much.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the comments guys; good stuff...

I ended up ordering the New Zealand indicators and they arrived today. Hoping to give them a try for a bit tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #14


Yup, they work.

My initial impressions:
- I fumbled a bit getting the proper amount of wool on. I think this will come natural after I use the material more.
- As expected, they are more difficult to cast in the wind than a bobber.
- Float nice'n'high and easy to see. I treated them as others suggested here.
- I like their sensitivity; seems like you can get a bit better of a read than when using a bobber.

A good one for the toolbox.
 

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Nice B Reelz!

I have not tried those. I mostly use Thingamabob. Will grab pinch on foam for shallow light weight spooky fish situations.

Did however try another type today for the first time, Corqs (recommended by a friend).

http://corqsflyfishing.com/

Used the small one and so far I like. But will need more time with it, I only fished it for 30 mins.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Did however try another type today for the first time, Corqs (recommended by a friend).

http://corqsflyfishing.com/

Used the small one and so far I like. But will need more time with it, I only fished it for 30 mins.
I've seen these, but haven't tried them yet.

So basically a bobber but made of cork?? Are they heavier or lighter than a bobber do you think?
 

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The connection to your leader is more gentle, so less likely to cut the line.

Weight wise???? Not sure, hadn't thought about it. Just got'em few days ago. They don't seem heavy. Float like a cork:)

When I used the one today went from big Thinga to small Corqs.It was raining, windy and cold. I happened to see two nice fish shallow and switched to hook one and then proceeded to lose that fish. Gave up fishing after that. So I don't think I even had a half hour with it.

will use it again monday and let you know.
 

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B Reelz

The lrg Corqs are about the same size as the medium sized Thinga's

Here are the weights of each:

Med Corqs 0.53grams

Med Thinga
Pink 0.49 grams
white w/peg 0.60 grams
clear glow in the dark 0.66 grams
red/white bobber lookin one 0.84 grams


lrg Corqs 0.87 grams


lrg Thinga 1.11
clr 0.96 grams


Surprised that the color of the Thinga's made a difference in the weight.

Some of the Thinga's you can tell have more weight because they are "harder" than others.


My friend that turned me onto these says that the Corqs will not hold up with lots of weight as well as the Thing's do.

I am still in the trial and error stages. :smile:

hope this helps
 

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